1. Limited time only! Sign up for a free 30min personal tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Weight down a slope

  1. Oct 3, 2009 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    I have attached a picture of the problem to this thread, I am having trouble with part c. I am getting an answer which is much larger than 24.5N

    The systems shown in the figures are in equilibrium. If the spring scales are
    calibrated in newtons, what do they read? (assume the incline in part (c) is frictionless.)


    2. Relevant equations
    Fw = mg


    3. The attempt at a solution
    I have attempted the solution and worked out the component of the weight force acting down the slope using Fw = mg / sin(30) = 49 / sin (30) = 98 N
     

    Attached Files:

  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 3, 2009 #2

    tiny-tim

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    Welcome to PF!

    Hi bettysuarez! Welcome to PF! :smile:

    (I can't see the picture yet, but …)
    You seem to finding the hypotenuse of a vector triangle :confused:

    they don't work that way! (not without a horizontal force :wink:).​

    Just use the usual cosine formula for a component. :smile:
     
  4. Oct 3, 2009 #3
    Sorry, I'm still a bit confused... The 5 kg weight is on a 30˚ slope and the spring scale is on the slope as well. How am I supposed to work out a horizontal force? Is that the force that will be recorded by the spring scale?

    Thank you!
     
  5. Oct 3, 2009 #4

    tiny-tim

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    No, I was saying that there's no horizontal force! :smile:

    Just use the cosine formula. :wink:
     
  6. Oct 3, 2009 #5
    Hint:

    The horizontal weight is equal to the weight times the cosine of the angle of incline...
     
  7. Oct 3, 2009 #6

    tiny-tim

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    erm :redface:

    … no such thing as horizontal weight! :confused:
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook




Similar Discussions: Weight down a slope
Loading...