Weight lifting

  1. Why don't we just skip the formalities and compare penis sizes right now?

    Sure, but that just means they pushed themselves too hard. Congrats! You now cannot work that part of your body for a significant amount of time. How strong will that make you?

    Holy crap you're right! I'll go try and deadlift 700lbs so I can tear my hamstrings and dislocate a disk in my spine. That will make me stronger, right????


    If you get injured in training, you are doing it wrong or there was an accident. Period. Not to mention, muscle doesn't even regenerate fast enough for it to make sense to go balls to the wall every single time. If you train to failure ever session you're not making much progress.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Re: Feats of superhuman strength

    you really just don't know what you're talking about. sure, if you never strain yourself, you're less likely to get injured. but people get injuries in different sports all the time, even when they're not pushing themselves to the limit.

    if your sport happens to be powerlifting, the only way you're going to make progress is by adding weight to the bar over time. you may deload for a time, but before you get too detrained, you go right back to heavy loading. it's called progressive overload.

    for what it's worth, i really don't care how much you lift. i don't even think you do.
     
  4. Re: Feats of superhuman strength

    Yes, those fall under the category of "accident". Nobody intends to go on the basketball court so they can get their arm broken.

    Yup. Our disagreement comes down to how often you add that weight and what your offset is.

    Funny thing is that I haven't been able to find a single source that says power lifters should train to failure all the time and work out with a significant risk of injury, so they can improve.

    Yeah yeah, it's only the internet. I bet all the real power lifters simply have fingers so large that they can't type on a keyboard so they just stay off the internet, right?

    Them be some fancy words. Where did you get edjumacated like that?

    And I don't believe you have any idea what you are talking about. Does that make us even?
     
  5. Re: Feats of superhuman strength

    what do you mean by offset?

    i never said anything about training to failure all the time. i even mentioned deloading, which you seem to brush off as a fancy concept.

    i'm still waiting. do you have any experience lifting at all?
     
  6. Re: Feats of superhuman strength

    How much weight you start with when you begin training.

    Which is completely different than what I am saying. "Deloading" means going back down after you have reached some weight X, right?

    Training to failure means training until you cannot complete another rep. You have to do that every now and then, but if you do that every workout, you won't make gains and can possibly hurt yourself.

    This is similar to the guy at the gym who goes "I come here to bench press every day! How come I'm not making any gains? :( "

    Still waiting for what? Find me a source that says what you are saying (that you should train to your max all the time and injuries are to be proud of) and I'll give you some number, and then you'll say you don't believe me, and then I'll say I don't care, and you'll say I don't really train, and I'll say you have no idea what you are talking about.

    Sound about right to you?
     
  7. Re: Feats of superhuman strength

    that's pretty individual, and about all you can do to choose a beginning weight is test your strength, then work at some percentage of that.

    yes, it is backing down. for instance, maybe you would start at a weight and rep-range that is 80-85% of what you're capable of. then you plan over the course of say 3 weeks to progressively increase the weight lifted until you're at 100-105%. this is a plan, of course, you may actually fail at the end of that 3 weeks, but you're still approaching a limit. then on the 4th week you deload to a much lighter weight, say 70%, and maybe even increase reps.

    that depends. i had a lot more injury when i worked in a low rep range often. but when i switched to a rest-pause scheme that uses a light weight range, but higher reps, i didn't stay injured and started making gains again. and by the way, on that rest-pause scheme, you go to failure every single set, with short rests between sets. the key for me seemed to be that the weight is just heavy enough to promote hypertrophy, yet not so heavy that it causes injury.

    yeah, every day doesn't allow for recovery. that's a recipe for failure. i found i did well with a frequency of once every 5 days. at most, you shouldn't train one exercise hard more than 3X/week.

    whatever. why don't you go find a forum where people who train competitively hang out, and do a poll. ask them if they've never been injured. i suppose you could train and never get injured, but i don't think you would be competitive, either.
     
  8. Re: Feats of superhuman strength

    I thought we were talking about strength/power gain and not muscle mass gain?

    Yes, lower weight, higher rep is better suited for bodybuilding and will be inherently safer since you're using a smaller weight.


    How often you train depends on how hard you train. Rule of thumb is minimum 48 hours in between workouts of the same muscle group. The harder you train, the more time out you need. But training harder doesn't always give you more gains. If you train only once a week really hard, you're not going to improve as well as if you trained twice or even 3 times a week, but with less intensity.


    You're confusing "not wanting to get injured, but it happening anyway" with "training without regard for injury"

    You said powerlifters lift sooooo hard that they rip the meat off their bones and that injuries are like a badge of honor for them. That's not the same as saying "People get injured sometimes."

    Make up your mind. Nobody wants to get injured and everybody who does wishes they didn't. Nobody walks around with a smile on his face after he tears a muscle. If you are training with a reasonable routine, then you shouldn't get injured unless there is an accident. If you go too high on your weight, then yeah, you're asking for trouble.
     
  9. Wheres the opening dialogue from? I don't see anyone on here using "noob" other than jokingly.
     
  10. Ivan Seeking

    Ivan Seeking 12,535
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    Gold Member

  11. Ah, I figured as much after reading whats here so far. Don't think its too far off from a banning, I suppose.
     
  12. Re: Feats of superhuman strength

    if you want to keep getting stronger, you have to gain muscle mass. you can only go so far with neural gains.

    like i said, i found that every 5 days was close to ideal for the intensity i was training at. if i wanted to train 3X/wk i'd have to back down quite a bit. a lot of this is individual and varies by how long you've been training.

    no, i'm not. i've conversed with enough people over time to realize that getting injured is common, even among people that have formal athletic training.

    someone else said it was a badge of honor, i never said that. i'm just saying that it happens more often than you might think. i believe what i did say is that muscle tears are pretty common. maybe that is what you're confused about. not every tear is a complete rupture. usually, they're pretty benign. you see a little bruising and that's it, as i mentioned.

    i see now that you're confused. it's not even always painful, even if somebody forgets to lock their elbows on a deadlift and pulls the muscle off the bone (a bone-headed mistake, mind you, but it does happen, if somewhat rarely).

    besides, you're talking about powerlifting here, which is a competitive sport, and naturally involves lifting weight that is "too high". that is the whole point of powerlifting.
     
  13. Re: Feats of superhuman strength

    Mass doesn't always = strength. Most of those power lifters also have a nice layer of fat around them, simply because they'd rather make sure to get enough calories and protein than to count calories or risk being undernourished.

    Look at Lamar Grant, he was 130 something and dead lifted 661lbs. I couldn't find how tall he was at the time, but 130 is still pretty skinny.

    http://www.usaplnationals.com/2003MoState/images/lewisSQ_large.jpg/img]

    You can't tell me that's all muscle.

    [quote]like i said, i found that every 5 days was close to ideal for the intensity i was training at. if i wanted to train 3X/wk i'd have to back down quite a bit. a lot of this is individual and varies by how long you've been training.[/quote]

    No argument there.

    [quote]no, i'm not. i've conversed with enough people over time to realize that getting injured is common, even among people that have formal athletic training.[/quote]

    Yes, but you made it sound like they were training so hard because they didn't care about getting injured, when in reality the injuries happen as accidents.

    A bonehead move is to put on 50lbs more than you did last time because you think you're not getting gains fast enough.

    But if you're training smart, the risk of injury goes down substantially. And as far as I know, everybody with half a brain tries to avoid injuries.


    [quote]someone else said it was a badge of honor, i never said that.[/quote]

    Someone else is very stupid, then. Sorry that I attributed it to you.

    [quote] i'm just saying that it happens more often than you might think. i believe what i did say is that muscle tears are pretty common. maybe that is what you're confused about. not every tear is a complete rupture. usually, they're pretty benign. you see a little bruising and that's it, as i mentioned.[/quote]

    I know it can happen often. You're lifting heavy objects. I'm just saying nobody is going to substantially increase their risk of getting injured by going as hard as they can every single time.



    [quote]i see now that you're confused. it's not even always painful, even if somebody forgets to lock their elbows on a deadlift and pulls the muscle off the bone (a bone-headed mistake, mind you, but it does happen, if somewhat rarely).[/quote]

    Oh yeah. Forgetting to relax your biceps on a dead lift is always fun.

    [quote]besides, you're talking about powerlifting here, which is a competitive sport, and naturally involves lifting weight that is "too high". that is the whole point of powerlifting.[/QUOTE]

    You compete balls to the wall, sure, but you train just hard enough that you avoid injury. Look at all these MMA fighters. They get injured all the time, since that's the point of the sport. But if you see them train, they use pads, they don't go 100%, and they make sure not to exceed their limits, because an injury can really set you back.
     
  14. Re: Feats of superhuman strength

    no, it doesn't always equal strength, but it is the potential for strength. that's why i mentioned CNS gains. at some point, you're going to hit your strength limit for a set amount of muscle mass and will have to add more mass to gain strength.

    Lamar also has maybe the longest arms of any deadlifter, ever. a deadlift for him is like a rack lift for normal people. he is strong, but he also was gifted with mechanical leverages that most people do not have.

    nope, but i can tell you that the fat guys carry more muscle than the skinny guys. that's one of the reasons they eat so much. the real trick is trying to hold onto that muscle as you diet down. the p-ratio will kill your efforts. but, if you take a guy who's been a big fat powerlifter for a few years and diet him down properly, you'll see that he actually looks like a bodybuilder under all that blubber.

    i think we may just have to disagree here. it's kind of hard to know where your limits are until you've crossed them.

    yeah, depending on what you're doing, that could be pretty foolish.

    no argument there.

    better yet, just concentrate on activating your triceps, especially if you're using a mixed grip. i don't think i've ever tried to row it up with double overhand.

    MMA is not a 100% strength sport, so they don't need to go 100% on weights. skill and conditioning are more important.
     
  15. I meant 100% in the ring when they are practicing. They still don't pound on each other.

    My deadlift grip is/was kind of weird. At first I could only do it double overhand. Nothing else felt right. I had to take a break for a while, and when I came back to it, only mixed grip felt right and it's been like that ever since. I don't get why.
     
  16. When I dead lift how come I don't feel any burn in my hammys? I try to do them as correct as possible, but my hamstrings never feel the work out. What am I doing wrong? The next day my lower back is never sore, so I know I am not putting stress on my lower back. I always try to maintain a neutral spine.
     
  17. Hootenanny

    Hootenanny 9,678
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    Have you tried Romanian Dead-lifts? You won't need as much weight as you would for standard dead-lifts and you should feel it more in your hamstrings. However, you need to be careful that you don't try to go outside your range and keep strict form.
     
    Last edited: Nov 30, 2008
  18. How do you do those?
     
  19. Hootenanny

    Hootenanny 9,678
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    Click here and scroll down to the section "How To Perform The RDL (Romanian Deadlift)".
     
  20. I'll have to give 'em a try. Thanks.
     
  21. JasonRox

    JasonRox 2,327
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    What was the argument all about?

    I do have to say that the biggest mistakes in the gym is bad form, and the inability to do more weight. Those are the two biggest faults.
     
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