Weight Lifting

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If a person lifts weights at a particular level (by level I mean the weight amount for each exercise) and wants to keep his or her current "shape," then is there any reason that person ought to left lower levels?

For example, let's say you curl 10 lbs. of dumbbells and like the figure you've gotten. You wouldn't want to lift more, right, because that'd make you "thicker." But, is there any reason to left less (say, doing 2 or 5 lb. curls)?
 

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  • #2
berkeman
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Hopefully you've been doing some reading about this. What do you mean by "shape"? Are you mostly interested in sculpting your body, or are you interested in developing power and endurance in your body?

(I am no expert on this) One school of thought on training is to mix lighter-weight/high-rep days with heavier-weight/low-rep days, to gain both power and endurance. I don't think that maximizes your body shape, though.

I am an endurance athlete (swim-bike-run), so most of my lifting sets are based on medium weight and high reps (like 30-35 reps that leave me wasted at the end).
 
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  • #3
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I mean what physique you obtain by lifting x poundage of weights.

In other words, you don't want to get thicker, nor thinner. You just want to maintain whatever you look like AFTER having settled on a particular level of weights to exercise with.

In other words, if you curl 10 lbs. of weights and like the results you see, is there any reason to ever go lower? I know you wouldn't want to go higher (e.g., 15...20...25 lbs), as that would make you thicker in muscle. But, is there ever any reason to do 2...or 5 lb curls?
 
  • #4
Klystron
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I guess I am a maintenance athlete. I have preferred cable machines (Nautilus) weights to free weights since they became popular in the 1960's. I can only use free weights for light hand exercises as you describe. I prefer movement, endurance and strength to bulk.

When young I used what we called 'pyramid technique'. Say you can comfortably lift 20 lbs. in an exercise. You could lift 10 repetitions at 10 lbs., rest, 10 reps at 15 lbs., rest, then 10 reps at 20 lbs. or as many as comfortable. Rest, then 'walk down the pyramid': 15 lbs. for 10 reps, finishing at 10 reps of 10 pounds of weight.

This comprises a 'set'. Complete 3 or 4 sets then perform same using different muscles at appropriate weight levels. After completing 3 to 4 sets over several days, consider adding weight to the pyramid. In this example with 5 pound increments, try lifting 25 pounds. The pyramid then becomes 15-20-25-20-15 pounds. The idea is to challenge your body by changing weights but within your comfort zone to avoid strain and injury.

Pyramiding avoids boredom and the tendency to rush and leads to smooth lean muscle mass. Always move slowly. Never lift more than you can comfortably control. Breathe! Never hold your breath. Breath regularly. Exhale on the lift and inhale on the drop.

With a slow metabolism I need to warm up on a bike or with other aerobics before lifting. Like @berkeman I prefer swimming and a swimmer's physique (so to speak). Water supports your body but supplies resistance. With public pools temporarily closed, I am using weight machines, hand weights and elastic bands at physical therapy to maintain strength, balance and endurance.
 
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  • #5
pinball1970
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If a person lifts weights at a particular level (by level I mean the weight amount for each exercise) and wants to keep his or her current "shape," then is there any reason that person ought to left lower levels?

For example, let's say you curl 10 lbs. of dumbbells and like the figure you've gotten. You wouldn't want to lift more, right, because that'd make you "thicker." But, is there any reason to left less (say, doing 2 or 5 lb. curls)?
It's genetic, if you have a tendency to put muscle on you will. If you want to keep fit do cardio, cycling, running, swimming cross training.
Resistance training is more likely to put muscle on.

Work out your carb to energy out put ( there are apps apparently) keep a diary of what and when you eat.

Losing weight/flab is easy, you can do it and get fit in 4-6 weeks depending on your previous life style.

Gaining muscle is very difficult and takes time unless you are genetically blessed.

Edit: rule of thumb, high reps lower weights for maintenance.

Up your sets and weight slightly if it starts getting to easy.

You can pre exhaust first too, do more aerobic stuff first, weights then swim after.
 
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  • #6
Astronuc
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If a person lifts weights at a particular level (by level I mean the weight amount for each exercise) and wants to keep his or her current "shape," then is there any reason that person ought to left lower levels?

For example, let's say you curl 10 lbs. of dumbbells and like the figure you've gotten. You wouldn't want to lift more, right, because that'd make you "thicker." But, is there any reason to left less (say, doing 2 or 5 lb. curls)?
To maintain a certain level of fitness or strength, one could do repetitions with lighter weights, and perhaps increase the speed at which one moves the weights. To increase one's strength, one would increase the weight. The point of lighter weights (masses) is resistance.

Running, swimming, cycling and rowing would be light repetition, which improves endurance/stamina.

When I was lifting weights and gaining strength, I would max the weight, but also mix lighter weights, and go running long distance and finish with quarter mile or 400-500 m sprint. I'd also play football (soccer) with friends, or cycle some distance.

These days, I typically work with 25 lb (11.34 kg) and 40 lb (18.14 kg) dumbbells, and occasionally 60 lb (13.22 kg) dumbbells, and cycle long distances with some elevation gain.
 
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  • #7
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I mean what physique you obtain by lifting x poundage of weights.

In other words, you don't want to get thicker, nor thinner. You just want to maintain whatever you look like AFTER having settled on a particular level of weights to exercise with.

In other words, if you curl 10 lbs. of weights and like the results you see, is there any reason to ever go lower? I know you wouldn't want to go higher (e.g., 15...20...25 lbs), as that would make you thicker in muscle. But, is there ever any reason to do 2...or 5 lb curls?
Going down in weight would increase your cardio workout(heart) because you are doing more reps as long as you work the muscles to fatigue. You could still see gains in size this way,your workout would just take longer.
If you just want to mantain do less sets or don't workout as often.
 

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