Weight of a plane

  • Thread starter genneth
  • Start date
  • #51
It is very simple i think even simpler than the solution i will suggest:(I think that this answer has been said and also the riddle is not accurate as the given clues is not clear)
-with a tool like a nail you can make a hole in the tire and measure the time air takes to get out
and get another tire (not installed to a plane) and make the same hole with the same tool and measure the time it takes to get out..(repeat the steps for all the plane tires)
so that when the pressure of the tire is x time is y and when pressure is a time is b you can get by that way the pressure acting by the wire and the mass of the aeroplane where P=mg/A where where you got P and you have g and can get A approximately you can get m
-Determine the engine force that the pilot will apply in his flight when the plane is in horizontal position then resolute the force of the engine to the direction of motion and against weight so the component against weight divided by 9.8 is the mass
-you can ask anyone from the airport who will really know
-by measuring momentum as it impinges with anything i put in it's way when it is starting to move so that the momentum of thing i put (block of wood) can be measured you know it's velocity and you can apply the law of conservation of momentum
-I think the solution is even simpler.
 
Last edited:
  • #52
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Use the hammer to smash the plane into little pieces. Prop a ruled level on a screwdriver, and piece by piece, balance them with the hammer by adjusting the position of the screwdriver. If a piece is too heavy, smash it into smaller pieces. Use the formula weight * distance to hammer / distance to piece = weight of piece to find the weight of each piece. Find the sum of the weights of all those pieces.

Units will be in hammers.
 
  • #53
692
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I would compare it against something of known mass. For example, by ramming it into the said object I would see the effects. Something like a tall building would suffice.
 
  • #54
You know, if the toolbox has a torch, we could shine light from behind the plane and measure the deviation of flash light. (Hmm...I wonder if it's Flash light or Flash-light...).
I think it is 'flashlight'. No need to capitalize just because it emits photons.
 
  • #55
oh....

There has been many questions and fierce arguments over whether or not an airplane will take off if on a conveyor belt "runway"....with fierce answers, the question has been deemed simple, but with complicated answers.

One of my simplest solutions to this was a thought experiment.

OK, we know the plane is meant to take off from the ground,(ground to air) and find it difficult to answer.

A simpler tackle at this would be to imagine the plane coming from the air and landing on the conveyor strip.

we know if the plane (from ground to air) would not take off because of the conveyor belt, it would stop in a quicker amount of time, we know that the plane would not stop quicker if landing on it , concluding that it would take off, if it was on a conveyor belt.

Einstienear
 
  • #56
2,985
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Dude, this has been answered years ago. Search it. Were NOT discussing this lame question anymore. (It does take off). Have a nice day.

The reason this keeps coming up in other forums is becuase those other forums are full of guys who dont know a damn thing about physics and thus talk out their exhaust stacks on answers using examples that dont mean jack squat.


Am I a little sick of seeing this question pop up? -Just a little. :smile:
 

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