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Weird Facts of Physics

  1. Aug 22, 2004 #1
    I was just woundering, what are some of the weirdest facts you heard or read about physics in general?

    Weirdest thing i read about was about liquid Helium and how it flows out of its container when lifted but flows back in when set back down. And the other thing is that one teaspoon of matter from a black hole would weigh 1000s of tons on earth, probably because it was compressed in that strong gravitational field.
     
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  3. Aug 22, 2004 #2

    Math Is Hard

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    I heard once that if you took a bottle of water to Mars and poured it out, it would both freeze and boil and the same time!
    (don't know if that's 100% true or not, but I found it pretty fascinating).
     
  4. Aug 22, 2004 #3

    quasar987

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    Wouldn't that be "neutron star" instead of black hole? Because the black hole is a star infinitely small, you can put an infinity of black holes in a tea spoon. That'd add up to [itex]\infty[/itex] tons on earth :smile:.


    If someone could comment on that, that'd be great!
     
  5. Aug 22, 2004 #4
    Thats bizzare. The only thing i can think of is instead of heat making it boil, a vacuum does it. Maybe as it freezes in the cold temp, the vacuum sucks any gas out of the water (whitch is H and O, and those make up water in the whole).

    P.S.

    For any teens such as myself out there, that's a good demo if you make a science project concerning Mars. Us a vacuum pump (made with pyrex glass) and place it in a really cold, clear container or somthing. Then pour water in it and quickly put the top on and start pumping out the air. Thanks Math is Hard. (yout gonna have to give math is hard his/her credit :smile: )
     
  6. Aug 22, 2004 #5
    wow. [itex]\infty[/itex] black holes in a given space witch has [itex]\infty[/itex] weight. That's more intresting then a teaspoon of neutron star matter.
     
  7. Aug 23, 2004 #6

    Ivan Seeking

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    One thing that space [lunar] hotel planners have hit upon: On the moon, human powered, winged flight is possible. We could fly like birds in a large, enclosed stadium.

    Also, it is possible to run and jump off of at least one of the moons of Mars. You can leap into orbit.
     
  8. Aug 23, 2004 #7

    chroot

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    Ivan,

    You'd have some trouble using winged flight on the moon, which has no atmosphere.

    zynko,

    While general relativity predicts black holes have a singularity of infinite density inside, the whole story is yet to be concluded. Most likely, whatever theory succeeds general relativity and unifies it with quantum mechanics (string theory, m-theory, loop quantum gravity, etc.) will not predict a singularity. The density of a black hole is certainly very high, but probably not infinite.

    - Warren
     
  9. Aug 23, 2004 #8

    Ivan Seeking

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    "in a large, enclosed stadium."

    I checked but I don't seem to have the link. At least one Japanese Hotel chain is looking seriously at the idea of a lunar playground and resort for the extremely wealthy.
     
    Last edited: Aug 23, 2004
  10. Aug 23, 2004 #9

    I would think that if you had any black hole matter even in the vicinity of earth, it would suck everything in. If this is at all possible, which I dont think it is.
     
  11. Aug 23, 2004 #10
    If a black hole were to weigh an infinity tons, then it would suck in the whole universe in on itself. chroot is right, it is improper to think that infinity is a black holes dencity. The dencity is certanly high, but not infinity.
     
  12. Aug 23, 2004 #11
    it depends on the amount of matter you brought to the earth. If it was a significant chunk on a black hole, it would just form another black hole and suck the earth and the solar system into it, but if the amount of matter from a black hole were to be brought, and the radius of material did not satisfy the Schwarzschild radius: [tex] R_s = \frac {2GM}{c^2} [/tex], then the matter would just act as a dense cellestial body.
     
  13. Aug 23, 2004 #12

    Integral

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    This is the only reason I can think of for returning to the moon. The possibilities boggle the imagination.... Do you suppose that it will ever be know who was the first couple to ingage in low gravity .... , this is a family fourm so I'll let you all fill in the blank.
     
  14. Aug 23, 2004 #13

    arildno

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    Dearly Missed

    Just for safety reasons, I'd advise them to stick close together..
     
  15. Aug 23, 2004 #14

    Ivan Seeking

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    There was a husband and wife team that went up on the shuttle. Many winks and nods were reported.


    Edit: I must say, about a hundred jokes about the Russians and the space station come to mind, but that wouldn't be nice.

    I will only say this, Vodka, song, and 12 months in space. :biggrin:
     
    Last edited: Aug 23, 2004
  16. Aug 23, 2004 #15
    All the fuel in the world could only sustain the Sun for a few days.
    1 cm² of he Sun's surface shines with the birghtness of 232,500 candles.
    Saturn would float in water (if there was a large enough bucket).

    Don't know how Physics like they are for you but they are fast and at my finger tips.

    The Bob (2004 ©)
     
  17. Aug 23, 2004 #16
  18. Aug 23, 2004 #17
    I find Sonoluminescence kind of strange, but interesting. Ultrasonic vibrations in a liquid at just the right frequency actually makes light. They say that the heat created during cavitation is actually hotter than the surface of the sun.

    On another strange note, anyone have comments about the Hutchison Effect?
     
  19. Aug 23, 2004 #18

    chroot

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    I'd be careful with that one, The Bob:
    :uhh: Looks like the author should have taken my "Misconceptions of Relativity" quiz.

    - Warren
     
  20. Aug 23, 2004 #19
    I've never seen someone confuse mass, weight and volume so much.
     
  21. Aug 23, 2004 #20

    Math Is Hard

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    I am totally confused now, but it doesn't matter, because I was totally confused before! :rofl:
     
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