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Westinghouse intern

  1. May 25, 2009 #1
    This looks like an amazing place for a first time intern. Has anyone interned for them?
    Does anyone have advice if I apply for an internship?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 25, 2009 #2
    Re: Westinghouse

    Hi there,

    In which department are you looking for.

    Westinghouse, like many others are involved in so many different areas that it's hard to keep a global view of their activities.

    Cheers
     
  4. May 25, 2009 #3
    Re: Westinghouse

    How about something in the Nuclear reactor R&D sector?
     
  5. May 25, 2009 #4
    Re: Westinghouse

    Hi there,

    They are very active and one of the best in the world in Nuclear reactor. This is a very interesting department (also because I am a nuclear physicist).

    Have you considered doing further studies??? You could also look with Westinghouse to do graduate studies with them, in the practical field of reactor physics.

    Just a dream of mine. cheers
     
  6. May 25, 2009 #5
    Re: Westinghouse

    That definately sounds pretty neat, especially reactor physics.
    The only thing I'm worried about is how the nuclear industry will hold up.
    We[U.S.] hasn't built a new plant in a long time. Even now with the sustainability outlook it doesn't look like the public wans nuclear power.
    I am no expert but it looks like the nuke industry hasn't been effected too much(by comparison) by the recession. I am worried that if I choose to specialize in say"reactor physics" I could be left in the dumps for the future.
     
  7. May 25, 2009 #6

    Astronuc

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    Staff: Mentor

    Re: Westinghouse

    Westinghouse (owned by Toshiba and Shaw Group) is a major supplier of commercial LWR technology. They already have several Engineering, Procurement and Construction contract (EPC) contracts in place with major US utilities. It looks like China and S. Korea are also planning to build new plants of the AP1000 design.

    Westinghouse has offices in United States, Belgium, China, France, Germany, Sweden, so there are many interesting opportunities.

    Any engineer should be diversified. Reactor physics is just one specialty for a nuclear engineer. One could have a knowledge of mechanics of solids and thermal-hydraulics (or fluid mechanics). If possible, look at gaining some experience with computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Also, try to get exposure to multiphysics codes like COMSOL.
     
  8. May 25, 2009 #7
    Re: Westinghouse

    Hello,

    How hard would it be to get into Nuclear Engineering (controls) from Computer Engineering. Say I wanted to specialize in the Control/Sensing/Instruments and/or Communication systems used in plants. Would I need a Mechanical or Nuclear Engineering background?

    Also, How often are control systems in plants updated? Or are they made and embedded during initial design?
     
  9. May 25, 2009 #8

    Astronuc

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    Staff: Mentor

    Re: Westinghouse

    One would need some reactor physics courses, including one the deals with reactor kinetics. One would also need one or more EE courses in control theory, and other courses in electrical theory and circuits, likely some power electronics.

    Reactor control is tied to plant control, and it's all a matter of balancing the nuclear thermal energy with the output - electrical energy and waste energy (Rankine cycle efficiency is about 30-35% depending on plant design).

    Certainly software is part of it.

    Upgrading the instrumentation and control system is a big deal. I'll have to ask a friend who is familiar reactor/plant control systems.
     
  10. May 25, 2009 #9
    Re: Westinghouse

    Thanks Astronuc.
    I actually was thinking about learning COMSOL multiphysics, but I didn't know if it would used as wide as others. I think that COMSOL uses CFDs, are there any other specific type programs that you recommend? I was also thinking about taking a course in numerical partial differential equations because I know this is evolved in finite element, would this be a benefit.
     
  11. May 26, 2009 #10

    Astronuc

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    Staff: Mentor

    Re: Westinghouse

    I don't know if Westinghouse uses Comsol in-house, but it would be beneficial to have that experience. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is one aspect of multiphysics. There are other packages, e.g. ANSYS, ABAQUS, and NASTRAN, which seem to be the most popular. They have evolved over the past three decades or so.

    Other CFD packages included CFX (now owned by Ansys, and developed by AEA Technology) and STAR-CD. There is also Fluent, also owned by Ansys.

    See Ansys products here - http://www.ansys.com/products/default.asp#portfolio [Broken]

    One should ask in one's department or other engineering departments (Nuc Eng, Mech Eng, Civ Eng, Aero Eng) about Multiphysics and CFD codes.

    A course in numerical partial differential equations with some FEA would be highly beneficial. I did similar courses in grad school in which we studied the theory and developed our own CFD methods. That was before packages like CFX and STAR-CD were widely available. Now students use various CFD/Multiphysics packages, but it is important to know the theory, in order to know how to apply a method, and what it's limitations are.

    The several principals in my company actually developed proprietary FEA methods from scratch, and so they know the bases of the methods, i.e. the physics behind the analyses.


    I should also mention that with respect to the vendors (W, AREVA, Mitsubishi and GEH) of the Gen 3+ plants in the US, all have a reference fuel design in place. The fuel designs are based on currently operating fuel, particularly geometry and materials, so there is little room for substantial changes. One vendor is proposing something radically new, but that is still in the research (proof) phase.

    The next generation (Gen 4) plants are still in R&D, and that is mostly handled by INL (DOE). There are numerous technical issues to be resolved, e.g. materials degradation and corrosion, under the proposed environmental conditions.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  12. May 28, 2009 #11
    Re: Westinghouse

    Thanks for the reply Astronuc!
     
  13. May 30, 2009 #12
    Re: Westinghouse

    Thanks a lot Astronuc. So how would I find out what FEM software they use?
     
  14. May 30, 2009 #13

    Astronuc

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    Re: Westinghouse

    I know Westinghouse uses ANSYS since I've seen some analyses.

    For fluid dynamics, they apparently use FLUENT (ANSYS) and STAR-CD/STAR-CCM (Adapco).


    Westinghouse is currently hiring senior nuclear, mechanical and structural engineers - for example - Senior Thermal-Hydraulics Engineer ( Fluid Dynamics / CFD ) job at Westinghouse Electric Company in Monroeville, PA

    Position for a senior mechanical engineer

    With respect to nuclear methods, they have their own proprietary methods.
     
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