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Wet-bulb temperature

  1. Jan 16, 2016 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    Imagine a wet thermometer whose bulb is covered with a wet wick at 1 atm. Temperature of the water happens to drop during the process of evaporation.

    2. Relevant equations
    N/A

    3. The attempt at a solution
    Does evaporation lower the temperature of water just by removing high-kinetic-energy molecules and lowers it's temperature, just so there can be a driving force for heat transfer? So basically heat from the air is supplied to the water resulting in lowering it's temperature by some small amount?

    Somewhere I read that temeprature difference between wet and dry thermometer goes up to 10°C, or more. It's sorta shocking to me, does that mean that water and air at differ by that large amount in a real environment? So they are basically never in a thermal equilibrium until all water evaporates? Wow...

    I'm not really interested in math behind it, i just dont get what's going on in molecular, practical level.
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2016
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 16, 2016 #2
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