Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

What bird is this?

  1. Apr 11, 2009 #1

    Evo

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    I have 2 birds on my patio. I thought I could look it up in my bird book, but it's not there.

    It is about the size of a black eyed junko, perhaps a tiny bit larger, has a dark grey patch/stripe from the top of it's beak (like a mohawk) going down to the back of the head. It has a wide brown eye strip going from the beak to the back of the head, white patches on each side of the throat, with a black throat. the back and wings are a beautiful lattice design of dark brown and light brown, with a light belly.

    I know this is a common bird. A GOOBF card for the first person to post a picture of it.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 11, 2009 #2

    dlgoff

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

  4. Apr 11, 2009 #3

    Evo

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    That's not it. I will have to upload the picture to image shack, hold on.
     
  5. Apr 11, 2009 #4

    dlgoff

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Never mind Evo. I changed it to a different image. Sorry for the trouble.
     
  6. Apr 11, 2009 #5

    Evo

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Now you tell me. :wink:
     
  7. Apr 11, 2009 #6

    Danger

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    Never mind the looks. What does it taste like? :tongue2:
     
  8. Apr 11, 2009 #7
    You are an evil evil man!
     
  9. Apr 11, 2009 #8
    What? Dan's pic didn't give you enough of a warning that he's not the average guy?
     
  10. Apr 11, 2009 #9
    I thought Danger was taking the needs of one's cat into consideration. There's nothing enough for a human on tiny birds, but a decent meal for a feline.
     
  11. Apr 11, 2009 #10

    turbo

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    Gray mohawk and brown eye-stripe = House Sparrow. Very common.
     
  12. Apr 11, 2009 #11

    turbo

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    http://www.squidoo.com/housesparrow [Broken] What kind of offense is the GOOBF card good for?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  13. Apr 11, 2009 #12

    Astronuc

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor

    I think we can safely conclude that it's notagoshawk.
     
  14. Apr 11, 2009 #13

    turbo

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    Had a bird-rescue about 20 minutes ago. My wife went out in the driveway and came back asking me to come right out. There was a chickadee lying on its side in the driveway right beside my Forester (probably smacked a window), not moving. I scooped up the 'dee and held it, and it started blinking its eyes eventually. I cupped the bird in my hands and kept it warm, and eventually it recovered the perching function in its left foot, and started holding its left wing normally. The other 'dees were calling, too, and when the injured bird started swiveling its head to track the calls, I opened my hands, and the 'dee flew to my apple tree to gather its wits and recover. All's well.
     
  15. Apr 11, 2009 #14

    Redbelly98

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    That would be my guess as well.

    Whew.
     
  16. Apr 11, 2009 #15

    Evo

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    That's it!!! I knew it was common. Oh, it's a mean bird. :frown:

    A GOOBF card will get you out of any banable offense. Unfortunately, they expire without notice. Always good to stock up on them. Talk to Lisab, she somehow got her hands on billions of them.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  17. Apr 11, 2009 #16

    Danger

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    And this after I spent 10 minutes getting my fangs tucked in under my lip to look nice for my portrait... :grumpy:
     
  18. Apr 11, 2009 #17

    turbo

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    Don't rest too easy! I rescue woodpeckers:
    hairy.jpg

    BUT I have also rescued a number of hawks, including a female merlin who knocked herself out on my patio-door while killing a sisken, and a broad-winged fledgling that had managed to fall out of its nest. Handling hawks is pretty intense. They are passive when they are disoriented or well-restrained, but they are not so compliant when they become alert or can assert some freedom (wings not restrained, etc.)
     
  19. Apr 11, 2009 #18

    Evo

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    that's so cute!

    turbo, you're a good person.
     
  20. Apr 11, 2009 #19

    Borek

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Perhaps blinding them with a piece of cloth will help?
     
  21. Apr 11, 2009 #20

    turbo

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    Good training technique for falconry, but I fear that a wild hawk would not like that too much as a one-time thing. I talk to them in a calm voice while stroking them, and then when they start to get a bit agitated or willing to bite their rescuer, I take that as a sign that they are ready to be on their own. So far, it has worked out well.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook




Similar Discussions: What bird is this?
  1. The Birds (Replies: 4)

  2. Baby birds (Replies: 28)

  3. Bird in the house (Replies: 27)

Loading...