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What bug is this?

  1. Jul 7, 2006 #1

    Hurkyl

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    (I hope my ASCII drawing is passable)

    What bug is this? I just saw one in my bathroom. I tried squashing it, but it wound up being pretty resiliant (though, admittedly, all I had handy to squash it with was a dirty towel)

    It wasn't moving around at all, except for its two antannae out front. It was a blackish color (maybe a little brown), maybe about 2 centimeters long and thin. The most distinctive feature was its tail end, which I think turns out well in my drawing.

    Code (Text):


     --\          /--
        \        /
         \      /
          \    /
           ****
          ******
          ******
      --  ******  --
        --******--
          ******
          ******
      ----******----
          ******
          ******
        --******--
      --  ******  --
          ******
          ******
          ******
         **    **
        **      **
        **      **
         **    **    
     
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 7, 2006 #2

    Bystander

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  4. Jul 7, 2006 #3

    arildno

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    Dearly Missed

    The earwig has relatively large, folded wings normally protected and invisible. (I don't think anyone has ever seen the earwig fly, actually)

    The most probable use for its pincer would be to help folding together its wings.
     
  5. Jul 7, 2006 #4

    Hurkyl

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    Ah, ok. I had found a picture of an earwig (wikipedia's page), but it was the wrong color and the tail was wrongly shaped... but those pictures look more like what I saw.
     
  6. Jul 8, 2006 #5

    Ouabache

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    The etymology of its name is intriguing..

    Earwig is derived from Old English éare, "ear", and wicga, "insect", "from the idea that it penetrates into the head through the ear. (presumably using its formidable pincers) and laying its eggs in the brain.

    reference01
    reference02

    This is from an old European belief but the notion still persists throughout the world today.

    I found a number of them recently around moist areas outside my camping tent. As a child, I recall finding them under logs and stones (again moist environments..
     
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2006
  7. Jul 8, 2006 #6
    It's earwig shaped, but I've ne'er seen one 2cm long... although thinking about it, I guess they grow to close that.
    And they really are resilient, not just against towels but boots and car tyres. If you use a grinding motion instead of a pressing motion, though, you can kill 'em.
     
  8. Jul 8, 2006 #7

    arildno

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    Just snap'em in two with a pair of scissors. That'll do.
     
  9. Jul 8, 2006 #8
    Yes, I always carry around a pair of scissors in my back pocket. :rolleyes:
     
  10. Jul 8, 2006 #9

    dav2008

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    You should be careful not to sit on them
     
  11. Jul 8, 2006 #10
    i saw something that looked like this yesterday, but it wasn't an earwig - its length was about 2cm, silverish gray color, no wings, and it's thinner then the earwig... the scissors at the end have the same width as the body...
    i thought it was a silverfish, but the tail of the silverfish doesn;t have the right shape...
     
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