What camera

  • Thread starter wolram
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  • #26
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for documenting a bike transition, x3 optical zoom is okay, and i think you don't need more then 3Mpixels for it if you're not going to enlarge it digitally, or print it on a big piece of paper.

for catching local beuty spots, again if it's for posting them on the net, 3Mpixels are more then enough...

but if you intend on getting decent face shots, without sticking the camera in your subject's face, i think x6 zoom or better should be considered...
(but remember, as Warren pointed out, that more zoom will make your camera bigger)

and for your question - yes, i think all the entry-level and budget cameras come with auto-focus and adjust to different light enviorements (with the more expansive ones you get manual control in addition to the automated control, and you can get some really cool pictures if you know how to set it right...)
 
  • #27
brewnog
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I consider anything above 4.5MP on a compact 'pocket' camera to be a waste; the limiting factor becomes the lens, and you need to go up to something with a decent bright lens to be able to get the most out of the bigger CCD.
 
  • #28
Moonbear
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wolram said:
Do most of these cameras adjust automaticaly to different light levels?
I think most do. You should check specifically for any one you're thinking of buying though before you buy it.

I guess i will not need super quality and the less gizmos the better, i just need a solid dependable one.
Chances are, from what you're describing, you don't need much of anything special.

For example, the photo I posted in the "Country Roads" contest was taken with my old camera, which was only 1.3 megapixels (I think...I can double check, but it's not too relevant...the point is that EVERYTHING on the market now is better than that, even the very cheap cameras). I had a few problems with that old one that were the reason I got a new one: 1) it was big and clunky, so I never wanted to carry it anyplace, 2) it sucked the juice out of batteries like mad...I could get about 12 pictures using a flash before the batteries were dead, 3) it was really slow to get ready for a second picture, especially if using a flash, so if I wanted to get a couple photos in a row of something, I could only get the first one...it was as slow as recharging a flash on a disposable camera, 4) the color was a bit "off" at times, usually giving everything a more reddish appearance, especially in lower light that it really couldn't compensate for.

So, regarding those issues:
1) Size isn't as important to everyone. If you don't need to toss the camera in your pocket when headed off somewhere, and are okay with putting it in a carrying case over your shoulder or on a wrist strap, etc., then any camera is fine.

2) Look for rechargeable batteries. If you're just going to take a few pictures here and there, it's less important, but if you take a vacation and don't want to carry an extra suitcase for batteries, getting something that has a long battery life and is rechargeable is going to be important for most users. (Very few of the cameras I looked at still required regular batteries, most came with the rechargeable battery.)

3) I don't think ANY camera on the market now is that slow. If you're mostly taking photos of things that are standing still, it's not too much of an issue anyway, but if you're likely to go out and try to capture some action shots, you would probably want to test any cameras to see how quickly they recharge the flash and how much delay there is between pressing the button and getting the photo taken.

4) I haven't seen this problem with newer cameras, but you could just check if they have an automatic white balance (AWB) feature. That should automatically adjust the colors for varying light conditions so they don't come out too red or blue and look more true to the actual colors. I find this mostly an issue on indoor photos and not much of an issue if you're only taking outdoor photos, where you have full-spectrum sunlight.

From what you're describing, probably even the least expensive camera on the market will suit your purposes.
 

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