What can $611 billion buy?

  • News
  • Thread starter fourier jr
  • Start date
  • #26
Economist
what that really means is "Give money to the Teacher's Union."

LOL. Agreed.
 
  • #27
BobG
Science Advisor
Homework Helper
185
82
I meant that they've kept asking for increased funding, and sometimes they get it. Even controlling for inflation, public school spending has increased substantially over the past 30 - 40 years, but the results have stayed the same. That's inefficient in my opinion. Furthermore, when you see what schools do with increased funding it's rarely for the students (and usually for administrators and teachers).

I don't think most private schools' cost $14,000 - $16,000 a year. I read that per student public schools have more money than private schools (on average obviously). Don't forget that public schools are funded for with tax money. Why can't parents receive the amount of funding the school would have spent on their child, but take that money to whatever school they want (public or private)?

By the way, I realize that private school students tend to come from better economic conditions, which is a factor in their performance. Obviously any good study/analysis would have to control for this factor. Caroline Hoxby (econ professor at Harvard) has studied charter schools and voucher systems and found that they tend to increase the performance of poor children significantly.



Actually, this is part of a reason that vouchers should be beneficial. Currently, the only people who can afford to send their children to private schools are the people who can pay tuition twice (once in the form of taxes, and once in the form of tution). Vouchers would allow poor people to compete more with the rich on where to send their children.



I haven't read this article yet, but I plan to do so today. I just wanted to ask you one question first. Do you consider the Department of Education to be an agency that has no stake in this debate?

Hence the dots. Normally, I'd say this would be a very reliable source. It at least looks like a conflict of interest when the Dept of Ed is comparing itself to private schools. That doesn't necessarily mean it is. Government agencies decide to outsource more government services all the time depending on whose running the government. It sometimes seems like half the miltary has been outsourced - at least a lot of the support positions.

The non-religious private schools were higher because they were split from religious schools, which are also considered private. There's a lot more private religious schools than non-religion associated private schools (especially Catholic schools).

Presumably, a voucher system would result in non-religious private schools that cater to the average family, but it could just mean an increase in schools like the White Hat program. That's probably not a fair comparison, since White Hat targets the audience that's available: students not fitting into a public system and supporting home schoolers. Considering most of the students they cater to would probably drop out completely if left in public schools, they do provide value for their money. Their method of education (on-line classes without certified teachers in the classroom) would have to look pretty appealing to a lot of companies wanting to step into an increased private market and it might even work. I just wouldn't expect it to work as well as classes with real teachers.
 

Related Threads on What can $611 billion buy?

  • Last Post
3
Replies
62
Views
140K
  • Last Post
2
Replies
47
Views
3K
  • Last Post
Replies
3
Views
5K
  • Last Post
2
Replies
28
Views
12K
Replies
6
Views
3K
Replies
14
Views
2K
  • Last Post
Replies
19
Views
2K
Replies
2
Views
2K
  • Last Post
2
Replies
43
Views
4K
Top