What careers are used in NASA?

In summary: If you are thinking about doing mechanical engineering, you would potentially have opportunities pretty much anywhere, including NASA. I definitely recommend engineering if you are interested in any sort of technical job in industry or any job at a tech oriented organization.
  • #1
AlexES16
113
1
I was thinking in mechanical engineering or mechatronic engineering, i really want to build things and love physics and math. I only left 4 months to choose career, some lights please.
 
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  • #2
Are you in high school and deciding which university course to apply to or...?

If so, why is NASA mentioned? There are many companies for engineers building the sort of things you might imagine happen at NASA, not least of all defence and aeronautic companies.

You could also think about aeronautical engineering.
 
  • #3
fasterthanjoao said:
Are you in high school and deciding which university course to apply to or...?

If so, why is NASA mentioned? There are many companies for engineers building the sort of things you might imagine happen at NASA, not least of all defence and aeronautic companies.

You could also think about aeronautical engineering.

Well i mentioned NASA becouse of the space ships, robots and stuff like that, but you say there are many companies that make this kind of things. I am in my last year of high school and deciding for a career in which you learn how to build machines and stuff like that. In october i have to make the exam for entering the University, and I am watching careers like mechanical/mechatronic.
 
  • #4
Any one knows?
 
  • #5
If you are thinking about doing mechanical engineering, you would potentially have opportunities pretty much anywhere, including NASA. I definitely recommend engineering if you are interested in any sort of technical job in industry or any job at a tech oriented organization.
 
  • #6
Ability to count backwards from 10?

Actually according to a friend at Nasa, that is contracted out !
 
  • #7
mgb_phys said:
Ability to count backwards from 10?

Actually according to a friend at Nasa, that is contracted out !

This is both funny and true!

Regarding the original post: NASA uses all sorts of different careers. NASA does a very large and varied number of things and needs as many different types of engineers and scientists as required. The group I work in has Mathematicians (all applied math), Physicists (mostly nuclear but a few who come from high energy phenomenology) and Nuclear Engineers. All the researchers in our group have PhDs. This is not always the case. The other major groups in our branch (who do decidedly different research) are mainly aerospace engineers, mechanical engineers, material scientists and applied physicists.

You can get a glimpse into some of the research done at the center I work at here: http://researchtech.larc.nasa.gov/resrch_area/index.htm

One thing to note here is that I am including both civil servants and contractors/grantees here. There are a lot more contractors/grantees than civil servants (a civil servant is an actual NASA employee, while a contractor or grantee is someone who holds a contract or a grant funded by NASA but works for a different company or institution). NASA was (is?) moving to having research be largely performed by contractors/grantees. There has been talk recently (last few years) about reversing this trend, but there has not been a lot of movement on that front that I have seen.
 
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  • #8
@ Norman...
can u pls ellaborate over such options for international students?i hve done masters in physics and a research prjct in nuclear physics as well..nw m wrkin as a software developer in an IT company...
 
  • #9
Thank you guys for the answers =). Looks like Mechanical Engineering is more spread than Mechatronics maybe i make first mechanical engineering and next Mechatronics?
 

1. What types of careers are available at NASA?

There are a wide variety of careers available at NASA, including engineering, science, technology, mathematics, and administrative roles. There are also opportunities for pilots, astronauts, and support personnel.

2. What qualifications are needed for a career at NASA?

Qualifications for a career at NASA vary depending on the specific role, but generally include a strong educational background in a relevant field, such as science or engineering, as well as relevant work experience and skills. Some roles may also require specific certifications or licenses.

3. Are there opportunities for internships or entry-level positions at NASA?

Yes, NASA offers a variety of internships and entry-level positions for students and recent graduates. These opportunities allow individuals to gain valuable experience and skills while working on exciting projects at NASA.

4. What is the application process for a career at NASA?

The application process for a career at NASA varies depending on the specific role, but generally involves submitting a resume or CV, completing an application, and potentially going through a series of interviews and assessments. Some roles may also require a security clearance.

5. Are there opportunities for international applicants to work at NASA?

Yes, NASA welcomes and encourages international applicants for many of its positions. However, some roles may have citizenship requirements due to security or other reasons, so it is important to carefully review the job posting before applying.

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