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What could dark matter be?

  1. Nov 1, 2013 #1
    Hi all,

    I was wondering, could the dark matter just be the particles that actually pop in and out of existence inside the protons and neutrons and all other matter or anti-matter?

    Please enlighten me if my assumption is wrong somewhere.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 1, 2013 #2

    Simon Bridge

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    If I have understood what you are getting at:
    That's already accounted for as binding energy and mass for the protons and neutrons and etc.
     
  4. Nov 1, 2013 #3
    I don't think so, I do understand the binding force, but that's not what I am thinking about, I am thinking about the empty space between the quarks, and everywhere else for that matter. Maybe even outside of atoms. I am not so convinced about outside of atoms as yet
     
  5. Nov 1, 2013 #4

    Simon Bridge

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    The particles popping in and our of existence in the "empty space" between quarks is taken into account as vacuum energy... it's one of the suggested constituents of dark energy.

    According to the Planck mission team, and based on the standard model of cosmology, the total mass–energy of the known universe contains 4.9% ordinary matter, 26.8% dark matter and 68.3% dark energy.

    http://arstechnica.com/science/2013...-the-universe-is-still-weird-and-interesting/
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1303.5062

    If you are referring to some other mechanism for particles popping in and out of existence inside nucleons ... then I'll need to see a reference.
     
  6. Nov 2, 2013 #5

    PAllen

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    Dark matter has a distribution derived very directly from gravitational lensing observations and indirectly from the paths of stars in galaxies, galaxies in clusters. These imply most of it is where there are very few atoms or ordinary particles.
     
  7. Nov 2, 2013 #6
    Right now the leading theory is WIMPS although I heard something about LUX getting negative results on that?
     
  8. Nov 2, 2013 #7

    PAllen

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  9. Nov 2, 2013 #8

    Chalnoth

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    Such particles wouldn't cluster like dark matter does. Clustering requires them to be persistent.
     
  10. Nov 3, 2013 #9
    I was thinking that dark matter even isn't matter, its a force because apparently it might be interacting with gravity and gravity is a force.
     
  11. Nov 3, 2013 #10

    phinds

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    That is unsupportable personal speculation and as such it is not appropriate for this forum.
     
  12. Nov 3, 2013 #11
    Dryogeshd it self has given his/her idea, you are allowed to discuss and give your own reference to the question.
     
  13. Nov 3, 2013 #12

    phinds

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    Not when your idea is unsupportable personal speculation. Read the forum rules
     
  14. Nov 3, 2013 #13
    Is the question by itself supportable?
    Are all theories SUPPORTABLE?
     
  15. Nov 3, 2013 #14

    phinds

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    The original question was just that ... a QUESTION. The OP did not make unsupportable personal speculation, he asked a question. You made a statement.
     
  16. Nov 3, 2013 #15
    Comment on the statement
     
  17. Nov 3, 2013 #16

    phinds

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    The statement is unsupportable personal speculation, as I have already said.
     
  18. Nov 3, 2013 #17

    Drakkith

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    Forces act upon particles, so no, dark matter itself is not a force. Realize that there are no forces that act upon other forces. None of the 4 fundamental forces of nature interact with each other in any way. They act solely upon the particles themselves.
     
  19. Nov 4, 2013 #18
    So how about gravity, thats not a particle, is it? Its the curvature of space-time which acts on particles and other matters.
     
  20. Nov 4, 2013 #19

    phinds

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    Yes, dark matter is known to interact gravitationally both with normal matter and with itself. What does that have to do with your statement that
    If it isn't matter how does it interact gravitationally? You seem to be really confused about this. There are numerous articles available about dark matter. Why don't you study up on it a bit?
     
  21. Nov 4, 2013 #20

    Drakkith

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    No, gravity is not a particle.
     
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