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What do these symbols mean?

  1. Aug 4, 2014 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    I have been reading a lot about physics and equation that look like the photo I attached. What do the brackets and the EXP mean?


    2. Relevant equations



    3. The attempt at a solution
     

    Attached Files:

  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 4, 2014 #2
    I cannot see the attached image, however, if you mean something like this: [itex] \exp (x) [/itex] that is just the exponential function, so [itex] \exp(x) = e^x [/itex]

    It's just a more convenient way of representing the function when its arguments start to get complicated
     
  4. Aug 4, 2014 #3

    HallsofIvy

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    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor

    The brackets are just that- a way of indicating a separate calculation, no different from parentheses.
     
  5. Aug 5, 2014 #4



    Here is a better picture ImageUploadedByPhysics Forums1407259101.931582.jpg
    If someone could write it without EXP that would be great so that I know what you guys are talking about.
     
  6. Aug 5, 2014 #5

    jedishrfu

    Staff: Mentor

    The exp() notation is useful though if you are writing an expression in some programming languages such as Java where

    Code (Text):

    double x = 3.2;
    double y = Math.exp(x);       // refers to the e^x math function
     
    For more general exponentiation then:

    Code (Text):

    double x =3.2;
    double y = 4.3;
    double z = Math.pow(x,y);     // for x^y math function
     
     
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2014
  7. Aug 5, 2014 #6

    AlephZero

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    ##I = C_1 + C_2 G - C_3(e^{\frac {V} {C_4T_{cc}}} - 1) - C_5(e^{\frac {V} {C_6T_{cc}}} - 1) - \frac {V} {C_7T_{cc}}##
     
  8. Aug 5, 2014 #7
    Where are you getting the e? Is that euler's number?
     
  9. Aug 5, 2014 #8

    berkeman

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    Staff: Mentor

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