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What do these symbols mean?

  • Thread starter BrainMan
  • Start date
  • #1
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2

Homework Statement


I have been reading a lot about physics and equation that look like the photo I attached. What do the brackets and the EXP mean?


Homework Equations





The Attempt at a Solution

 

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Answers and Replies

  • #2
I cannot see the attached image, however, if you mean something like this: [itex] \exp (x) [/itex] that is just the exponential function, so [itex] \exp(x) = e^x [/itex]

It's just a more convenient way of representing the function when its arguments start to get complicated
 
  • #3
HallsofIvy
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Homework Helper
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The brackets are just that- a way of indicating a separate calculation, no different from parentheses.
 
  • #4
279
2
I cannot see the attached image, however, if you mean something like this: [itex] \exp (x) [/itex] that is just the exponential function, so [itex] \exp(x) = e^x [/itex]

It's just a more convenient way of representing the function when its arguments start to get complicated


The brackets are just that- a way of indicating a separate calculation, no different from parentheses.

Here is a better picture ImageUploadedByPhysics Forums1407259101.931582.jpg
If someone could write it without EXP that would be great so that I know what you guys are talking about.
 
  • #5
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The exp() notation is useful though if you are writing an expression in some programming languages such as Java where

Code:
double x = 3.2;
double y = Math.exp(x);       // refers to the e^x math function
For more general exponentiation then:

Code:
double x =3.2;
double y = 4.3;
double z = Math.pow(x,y);     // for x^y math function
 
Last edited:
  • #6
AlephZero
Science Advisor
Homework Helper
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##I = C_1 + C_2 G - C_3(e^{\frac {V} {C_4T_{cc}}} - 1) - C_5(e^{\frac {V} {C_6T_{cc}}} - 1) - \frac {V} {C_7T_{cc}}##
 
  • #7
279
2
##I = C_1 + C_2 G - C_3(e^{\frac {V} {C_4T_{cc}}} - 1) - C_5(e^{\frac {V} {C_6T_{cc}}} - 1) - \frac {V} {C_7T_{cc}}##
Where are you getting the e? Is that euler's number?
 

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