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Programs What does a double degree mean?

  1. Nov 15, 2017 #1
    Hi guys, I have a question about what is a double degree.

    I know the question sounds stupid, but in Italy, or maybe in Europe we have a different conception.
    For example when we say double degree that means that you graduate from two different university for the same major.
    Let's make an example.
    If someone graduate in Economics, and take a double degree he can graduate in a italian university ( for example) Rome, in economics, and a spanish one ( for example) Madrid, always in economics.
    So both universities recognize the degree.

    At the same time it seems that in other country people can take two majors in two different field like Physics and Economics or Business and Engineering which is something that I would love to do.

    In my country we are not allowed to do this, we have to took an only major degree.
    I wanted to ask if is possible to do what I said before in other countries.

    Thanks.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 15, 2017 #2
    I have Bachelors in Sociology and Psychology, graduated with both at the same time. Double major.
     
  4. Nov 15, 2017 #3

    Mark44

    Staff: Mentor

    Not saying that you're wrong, but why would anyone go to two different universities to get the same degree? Maybe it really is different in Italy, as you say, but in the rest of the world, the term "double degree" means that your one degree is in two subjects. In other words, in pursuing your bachelor's degree, you fulfilled the degree requirements for two different disciplines.
     
  5. Nov 15, 2017 #4
    It's not about going in two different universities, it's about getting the same degree that is recognized by two universities.
    Basically it's like you having took the same degree in two different university, that means that your skills are certificated by both of them.
     
  6. Nov 15, 2017 #5

    Mark44

    Staff: Mentor

    Here you are contradicting what you said in post #1. In your example, you talk about someone getting a degree in economics in Rome and the same degree in Madrid. Again, why would someone want to do this?

    No, I don't think so.
     
  7. Nov 15, 2017 #6
    I'm giving a more sample example.
    The University of Rome called Sapienza have a undergraduate degree in economics.
    A student join that undergraduate degree, and the university of Rome decide to collaborate to the university of Madrid, saying that the guy that obtain the major in economics at the university of Rome, will obtain in the same day also the major from the university of Madrid.

    So this is why it's called double degree.
     
  8. Nov 15, 2017 #7

    Mark44

    Staff: Mentor

    Did you make up this example or has it actually occurred? Can you cite a specific instance of this? By specific, I don't mean "Some guy told me ..."
     
  9. Nov 15, 2017 #8
  10. Nov 15, 2017 #9

    Mark44

    Staff: Mentor

    In your second link (the university in Genoa), they describe "double degree" as "Laurea Magistrale and Master of Science." The two degrees are Laurea Magisterale in Ingeniera Navale from University of Genoa, and Advanced Mechanical Engineering Master of Science from Cranfield University, UK.

    This sounds like two different degrees to me, with study carried out at two colleges.
     
  11. Nov 15, 2017 #10
    laurea magistrale e master of science are the same.
     
  12. Nov 15, 2017 #11

    Mark44

    Staff: Mentor

    But the degrees are different - one is naval engineering and the other is advanced mechanical engineering.
     
  13. Nov 15, 2017 #12
    In the US, I don't think a double degree (as you have described it ... a program run jointly by two schools leading to a degree issued by each school) is common. They may exist; I've never heard of anyone undergoing such a program; but I've never looked into it either. More common is a double major. This is typically a single degree (for example, a BS) from a single university, in which the student fulfills the requirements for two majors: e.g., physics and electrical engineering or physics and German literature (this is not made up, I know a student who actually did this). You mentioned that in Italy, it is often not allowed for a student to cross-enroll in different departments. In the US, there typically is not this restriction (although some universities are organized into different schools or colleges and sometimes there are restrictions between enrolling in departments that are in different schools or colleges).
     
  14. Nov 15, 2017 #13
  15. Nov 15, 2017 #14
    Another data point: I have double undergraduate BS degrees (not double majors!) one in Engineering and one in Physics both issued by the same college within the same US university I attended. It was not typical but I had at least two classmates that completed similar requirements and a number of others that had both a BS in Physics BS and BS in Math. Certainly if your classes are not chosen carefully to include at least some overlap it could be a prohibitive en devour from both a cost and time standpoint.

    I think what you are calling a double degree is sometimes called a joint or shared degree program here (the terminology varies based upon location). These programs are typically administered by one school but allow the students to take and receive reciprocal credit from a nearby institution (think Harvard and MIT). The advantage is that the students can seek out courses from experts that their home school may not possess. These joint programs are available at the BS/BA, MS/MA and PhD/DSc level. However you typically only receive a single degree issued by your home university (although it would be recognized by both provided your university was a member of one of the associations of colleges and universities in the US).

    Another variation is a joint program that allows you to earn two degrees concurrently such as a JD and PhD or a MD and PhD. The purpose of this program is to allow you to earn not only the minimum professional credentials such as a JD to practice your profession but also demonstrate a higher academic ability through your ability to complete a research degree.
     
  16. Nov 15, 2017 #15

    jtbell

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    Staff: Mentor

    The small college where I taught participates in dual-degree programs with some universities in our region. A student spends three years here, taking general-education courses and the lower-level physics courses required for a normal physics major, but not all the upper-level physics courses. Then he/she spends two years at the partner university, taking engineering courses. After completing the entire program (five years), he/she receives a bachelor of science degree in physics from here, and a bachelor of engineering (usually in electrical or mechanical engineering) from the partner school. In effect, we credit the engineering courses as substitutes for some of our courses, and the partner school credits our general-education and lower-level physics courses as substitutes for some of their courses.

    These arrangements are fairly common in the US.
     
  17. Nov 15, 2017 #16

    symbolipoint

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    Meaningless if in the same country. Could be extremely significant if done in two different countries; let other members explain that if they want to.
     
  18. Nov 16, 2017 #17
    Yes, in Europe double degree, it's a degree that is shared with another university.

    I would like to make something like this, to take a degree in physics and one in engineering.
    This could be a great opportunity to study the subjects I like.
    But I'm obliged to choose between Physics or Engineering, and even I chose engineering I have to choose between Mechanical, Electronic, Aerospace, Computer, Bioengineering, etc... I can't study two field of engineering...this is so sad for me.
     
  19. Nov 16, 2017 #18
    Could you clarify your options in Italy? Even if you don't formally get a double degree or a double major, are you allowed to take elective courses in another field? In the US, for example, if you major in physics, you typically are required to take a certain number of math courses, and often these courses are given in the math department. You typically have other required general distribution courses such as chemistry, history, and literature, which are given in their respective departments. You typically (with some exceptions as usual) are also free to take elective courses in nearly any other department: various engineering, chemistry, biology, computer science, foreign languages, ....

    Similarly, if you are an engineering major, typically you would take physics classes in the physics department, chemistry in the chemistry department, English literature in the humanities department ....

    So, in Italy, are you saying that if you major in physics, all courses for your major are self-contained within the physics department, and you are not permitted to enroll in courses offered by other departments?
     
  20. Nov 16, 2017 #19
    Wow, I didn't know that, it's so cool!

    No.
    When you subscribe to the university you have to accept the exams in the list, you stay only in one department, and you can't have the possibility to do something else.

    http://www.ccdfis.unimi.it/en/corsiDiStudio/2018/F95of1/index.html?
    http://cdl-fis.unipr.it/studiare/piano-degli-studi-201718
    http://corsi.unibo.it/fisica-laurea...ientamento=000&Indirizzo=000&Progressivo=2017
    http://fisica.campusnet.unito.it/do/home.pl/View?doc=esempio_percorso_L30_eng.html

    As you see, when you choose to study something in Italy, you have to say goodbye to other courses.
     
  21. Nov 16, 2017 #20

    symbolipoint

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    That is very bad and very sad.

    What does the department of Physics at the university do to make the students become competent and marketable graduates? How does their department deal with the deficiency of prohibiting the students from studying other helpful courses?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 16, 2017
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