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What gravity waves?

  1. Aug 2, 2005 #1

    amt

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    What gravity waves????

    Considering Gravity is the warping of space, then how is gravitational waves possible? Aren't we all sliding down the slopes of space due to the massive warping of space by ojects? isn't space pushing us down?

    Then why is gravitational waves a topic?

    Thanks.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 2, 2005 #2
    If you shake the object, the ripples will move away as waves.

    It's an interesting aspect of GR so it's a topic.
     
  4. Aug 3, 2005 #3

    quasar987

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    Doesn't gravitational waves exist in newtonian mechanics also? Shake a mass harmonically and watch the field at some point. It will oscillate. How are relativistic waves any different that that other then we can detect them through lenght contraction and time dilatation?
     
  5. Aug 3, 2005 #4

    pervect

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    Newtonian gravity doesn't have any gravity waves because it doesn't have any gravitational equivalent to magnetism.

    Magnetism is important, because acording to Maxwell's equations, a changing electric field gives rise to a magnetic field, and a changing magnetic field gives rise to an electric field. A self-sustining oscillation of electirc and magnetic fields which satisfies Maxwell's equations is responsible for light, radio waves, and all electromagnetic radiation.

    GR does have a gravitational equivalent to magnetism (gravitomagnetism, aka frame-dragging). Because weak-field GR obeys equations which are very similar to Maxwell's equations, the theory has self supporting gravitational "waves".
     
  6. Aug 3, 2005 #5
    Also, newtonian gravity does not have a finite speed of propagation.
     
  7. Aug 3, 2005 #6

    amt

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    So, the only way I can comprehend gravitational waves is by thinking that they are continuous (oscillation as explained by you all). So is it correct to think of it as continuous ripples accross space? though the frequency and speed of this ripple is still unknown?
     
  8. Aug 3, 2005 #7

    rbj

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    the difference is that the newtonian gravity waves would be travelling at infinite speed. the GR waves travel at the same speed that EM waves do in a vacuum.

    by the way, for weak gravitation the equations look exactly like Maxwell's Equations, except that charge density is replaced by mass density, and [tex] \frac{1}{4 \pi \epsilon_0} [/tex] is replaced by [tex] G [/tex]. there is some 1/2 factor with the B field having to do with something "spin 2" that i don't completely understand, but i think that sorta comes out in the wash.

    we really should not think of [tex] c [/tex] as merely the "speed of light" but as the speed of propagation of all things or actions "instantaneous".

    r b-j
     
  9. Aug 3, 2005 #8

    pervect

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    That's the best way of understanding them, the way that General Relativity describes them. General relativity is a classical theory, so it doesn't include quantum effects. Thus, the picture GR draws of gravity waves is the classical picture that - that of waves in spacs - not the quantum picture of particles following all possible paths.
     
  10. Aug 3, 2005 #9

    wolram

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    Do these waves get stronger when they encounter a gravity well ?
     
  11. Aug 3, 2005 #10
    In a way- the wavelength should shorten as they fall in and lengthen as
    they leave the well. Shorter wavelengths have higher energy but not
    higher amplitude.
     
  12. Aug 3, 2005 #11

    wolram

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    This is a fascinating subject, i can not understand what is actually oscillating
    though, i have read words like the, "metric", or the "vacuum", it confuses me.
     
  13. Aug 3, 2005 #12
    Significant question.


    Would you mind stating what empirical or theoretical evidence you have for believing that? Not that I have evidence to the contrary; just want to see how you arrived at that conclusion.

    Creator
     
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2005
  14. Aug 3, 2005 #13

    wolram

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    This is the point where things get,"sticky", and only for the brave.
     
  15. Aug 4, 2005 #14

    Danger

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    At the last that I heard anything about it, there are still experiments under way to detect and measure gravity waves. They involve immensely heavy metal cylinders hung like pendulems, or lying on their sides, but I can't recall the set-up.
     
  16. Aug 4, 2005 #15
    I think that LIGO is supposed to detect gravitational waves.
     
  17. Aug 4, 2005 #16

    amt

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    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna is supposed to be launched in 2013. This will be used to measure Gravity waves that is still resonating from the Big Bang (Article from DISCOVER magazine- August 2005 edition).
     
  18. Aug 5, 2005 #17

    Danger

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    I'm not familiar with that acronym, but it might very well be the one that I'm thinking of. If memory serves, it's based in Australia... possibly in an opal mine. I'm afraid that it's been several years since I saw anything about it.

    Very cool. That's a bit far off for a fellow of my age, but I shall attempt to retain my grip upon the mortal coil until such time as results come back.
     
  19. Aug 5, 2005 #18

    ahrkron

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    LIGO is based in the U.S. It is basically an interferometer (a la Michelson-Morley, just 4km length, L-shaped). There will be two of them to reject local noise.
     
  20. Aug 5, 2005 #19
    Another possible way to ponder on gravity waves is to watch the ripples on the surface of a pond or river, preferably with lots of ducks or boats moving around and just around sunset to get the most shimmering and glistening effect.
     
  21. Aug 5, 2005 #20

    wolram

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    But what, "medium", is rippling, if space itself can ripple it must have some
    mechanical properties.
     
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