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What happens after death?

  1. Oct 6, 2006 #1
    ...and i don't mean in the long run, the second you die, what do you feel?, see? or does everything just stop and your just gone spiritually and mentally because you need your brain to think? i mean, what would be of you? would you just be reborn? go to heaven? and this brings me to my next topic about Catholicism, I am catholic but I don't get why people think that is God is so good and just and kind, then why would be be so mean to condem anyone that dosn't believe in him or catholicism to hell? I know lots of great people who arn't religious will they all go to hell? what im saying is that i think we all end up whereever we think well end up, if i believe in heaven and hell it will be heaven or hell, if a budhist believes he will be reincarnated then he will be, our after life is decided upon us...


    and again i believe that we live in hell today, if we have been good this his hell we will go to heaven or somewhere better, but if we don't we just keep reliving this life. does anyone have any comments? agreements? objections?
     
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  3. Oct 6, 2006 #2
    I think you may benefit from reading about NDEs (Near Death Experiences). The first widely read book on NDEs was published in the 1970s. It is called "Life After Life" wriiten by Dr. Raymond Moody. There is also the more recent book called "Lessons From the Light" by psychologist Dr Kenneth Ring. There is also the 2,000 year old story of Christ being resurrected from death so there is the possibility that the soul surrives bodily death.
    On the other hand, I have grown a little skeptical of near death experiences for several reasons that I won't go into here.It is a possibility but if I don't survive bodily death and I enter nonexistence after death then that isn't such a bad thing.
    I do believe in some type of organizing principle that is governing the universe but I hate to use the term "God" since it implies some type of personal "God" that rewards and punishes which is a primitive design of a creator and is an idea used to try and control the moral conduct of the masses. Einstein also believed in some type of creator of the universe but his idea was one that was not personal.
    RAD
     
  4. Oct 6, 2006 #3
    I believe it is like it was before you were born, nothingness. I dont believe in any god but I believe if there is one or anything beyond this then well see it when we die, but personally I honestly dont know anything on the subject and am not happy with this existence. I would rather not exist at all or know more than we do now about god and everything, when it comes down to it though, everything is meaningless, even if there was a god, he would be pointless. Well actually, we wouldnt know because we aint him so we cant know. Exact same goes for the universe. So basically, we cant know so it eliminates the point for a point.
     
  5. Oct 6, 2006 #4

    arildno

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    My view: Zero,zip, nada, nothing.
    It is a chilling thought, but rather liberating, it is like realizing you're on top of the mountain and see before you all that ACTUALLY is, and it is all around you.
    Which shows you have strong, good moral fibres in you that naturally revolt at such ideas. Let no one, in particular CO-BELIEVERS, destroy those fibres in you!
    Which takes out some of the purported "truth" in religions, doesn't it?

    Well, your post is rather too religious/philosophical for me to comment on further.
     
  6. Oct 7, 2006 #5
    cool, thanks for the comments its always fun for me discussing stuff and comparing with other people, and yes it does take out the truth is religions o and fedorfan, i don't think life is completly meaningless, the life that lets say government and all our "leaders" have set up for us is actually meaningless so i agree with you on that but if it werent for the constraints and the laws and the borders life would be very meningful indeed since you'd experiance true happines of being free, but yes when it all comes down to it it is all meaning less but then answer this,,,

    why are we here???

    waiting for response
     
  7. Oct 7, 2006 #6

    arildno

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    For no reason whatsoever.
     
  8. Oct 7, 2006 #7
    I, like Richard Dawkins, think we, as humans, exist for one purpose: to study our world. To learn how it works. To understand and ponder why we exist (oo...the irony...it burns).

    I honestly don't believe in an external force that overlooks us as humans. I think religion may just be a form of science that looks at the world differently (to me it seems to look at it in an erroneous way).

    Anyway, what is life? Is it simply the absence of death or the presence of something new? What is morality? Is it the absence of immortailty or is it a quantity that we can measure? Humans exist to examine these problems using their amazing brains.
     
  9. Oct 7, 2006 #8
    interest4ing point of view
     
  10. Oct 7, 2006 #9

    selfAdjoint

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    Whether our brains arose through evolution or were somehow intended to happen (I Know that those two possibilities are not strictly independent), it is still the case that we have them, and they can do marvelous things, and it seems to me anyway that it is incumbent upon us to use them well. What "wel"l means in its largest sense we don't know, but in its local, one might say "perturbative" sense we know very well as all our literature and traditions agree.
     
  11. Oct 7, 2006 #10
    I have no idea why we are here, noone does because noone was there when it all started. I believe though that were here for no reason at all, simply because Ive found no reason to be here, but Ill take what was given to me and try to make the best of it.
     
  12. Oct 7, 2006 #11
    it will just be black and darkness.
     
  13. Oct 7, 2006 #12

    Math Is Hard

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    Just out of curiosity, what does it liberate you from? (I heard someone make that comment before and I didn't understand what it meant.)
     
  14. Oct 8, 2006 #13
    liberating you from what happens here on earth i'm guessing in my opinion it would be crime, drugs, pain, all that bad stuff
     
  15. Oct 8, 2006 #14

    arildno

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    Religion, for example.
     
  16. Oct 8, 2006 #15

    selfAdjoint

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    Math, different forms of religion have different constructions of who will go to Heaven and who to Hell. There was a recent study of how people in the US regarded God. In the North a preponderance saw God as benificent, helping us unite with Him. In the old South, however, they see God as a punishing monster who is ever ready to consign us to eternal torment.

    Lucretius, who wrote De Rerum Natura so long ago, saw that people were in terror of what the gods would do if they got angry. He saw it as liberation to sweep away the whole mythical fairy story and content him with atoms and the void. He saw his poem as a public service.
     
  17. Oct 8, 2006 #16

    Math Is Hard

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    I was expecting religion as the immediate answer, but I was thinking there was something more, since I think a person could live without religion but still believe there is a God. What I was thinking is that the sense of liberation is maybe a freedom from a nagging thought that maybe you have been kidding yourself all along by believing in something that can't be proven or disproven.

    I think that study is right on the money, SA. I grew up in the Bible Belt where many preachers are of the hell-fire and brimstone school. :devil: Some of them warned that we would be punished during life, some warned that we would be punished after, but eventually we were all going to get it for our sins. This fear led to control by religious groups in places where they should not have had any say (e.g., laws, school policies). If someone like Lucretius had come to my small town and started attempting to free people from their beliefs, he would have been in a peck of trouble with the city fathers.
     
  18. Oct 8, 2006 #17

    arildno

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    There is, of course, also the rather disturbing side of this that there are no one who is going to make sense out of your life, or show you what its substantial meaning IS. You are stripped bare, it is up to you, and you alone, to create sufficient meaning in your own life. No one else has made it for you, and there are no answers to it existing before you make them, either.
     
  19. Oct 16, 2006 #18
  20. Oct 16, 2006 #19
    to much to read before so i´ll simply tell how it is
    nothing happens after death, your existens end and thats it. no more living its just to accept it
     
  21. Oct 17, 2006 #20

    It seems you are not smart enough to imagine something beyond your hevan or hell or whatever. I cannot tell your the answer to your question. I don t think anyone can do it.
     
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