What happens if you drink only coca cola or soft drinks?

  • #26
jim mcnamara
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@arydberg - Note post #6 in this thread. Aspartame is a polypeptide. You eat literally billions of polypeptides every day in any cooked food. And some in fresh uncooked foods, too.

It is possible to be allergic to any polypeptide including aspartame. That is different from the nonsense you see on the internet about many food substances like GMO's, MSG and aspartame.. Go to the NIH website or the American Diabetes Association website. Get valid information. Please do not post more garbage. Thanks.

And thanks to @Evo for leaving your corrected post up.
 
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  • #27
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So far only the sweeteners in soft drinks have been mentioned. How about the leeching properties of some of the acids?
 
  • #28
Evo
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So far only the sweeteners in soft drinks have been mentioned. How about the leeching properties of some of the acids?
Are you referring to the enamel on teeth from acids in foods? Do you have appropriate sources you wish to discuss?
 
  • #29
Ygggdrasil
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What is better is cane sugar that is aviable in some sodas in the NYC area. It is the HFCS that causes diabeties.
Sucrose (in cane sugar) and HFCS are no different health-wise and both contribute to diabetes and other metabolic syndromes:
Each sucrose molecule consists of one molecule of fructose joined to one molecule of glucose. In the gut, these two components are quickly split apart. High-fructose corn syrup is a less expensive mixture of glucose and fructose. There is no point in belaboring the difference, Lustig says. “High-fructose corn syrup and sucrose are exactly the same,” Lustig says. “They’re equally bad. They’re both poison in high doses.”
https://www.ucsf.edu/news/2009/06/8187/obesity-and-metabolic-syndrome-driven-fructose-sugar-diet

This is also the view of the American Medical Association, though they note that disproving a difference is difficult, especially with regards to examining long-term effects:
High fructose corn syrup (HFCS) has become an increasingly common food ingredient in the last 40 years. However, there is concern that HFCS consumption increases the risk for obesity and other adverse health outcomes compared to other caloric sweeteners. The most commonly used types of HFCS (HFCS-42 and HFCS-55) are similar in composition to sucrose (table sugar), consisting of roughly equal amounts of fructose and glucose. The primary difference is that these monosaccharides exist free in solution in HFCS, but in disaccharide form in sucrose. The disaccharide sucrose is easily cleaved in the small intestine, so free fructose and glucose are absorbed from both sucrose and HFCS. The advantage to food manufacturers is that the free monosaccharides in HFCS provide better flavor enhancement, stability, freshness, texture, color, pourability, and consistency in foods in comparison to sucrose. Because the composition of HFCS and sucrose is so similar, particularly on absorption by the body, it appears unlikely that HFCS contributes more to obesity or other conditions than sucrose does. Nevertheless, few studies have evaluated the potentially differential effect of various sweeteners, particularly as they relate to health conditions such as obesity, which develop over relatively long periods of time. Improved nutrient databases are needed to analyze food consumption in epidemiologic studies, as are more strongly designed experimental studies, including those on the mechanism of action and relationship between fructose dose and response. At the present time, there is insufficient evidence to ban or otherwise restrict use of HFCS or other fructose-containing sweeteners in the food supply or to require the use of warning labels on products containing HFCS. Nevertheless, dietary advice to limit consumption of all added caloric sweeteners, including HFCS, is warranted.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20516261
 
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  • #30
Evo
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I think we've beaten this thread to death, thanks to all that went out of their way to find appropriate answers. Thread closed.
 
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