What if speed=time/distance? Torpidity

In summary, the conversation discusses the concept of discrete space-time using a checkerboard model. This model includes finite space and time units, with a maximum velocity of one unit per time unit. It is not possible to travel below this maximum, but it is possible to travel multiple time units for one space unit. This has implications for t/d considerations and the concept of torpidity. The thread is now closed for moderation.
  • #1
rayj
15
6
I really liked this thread I just found on this forum. I would like to continue it as I just read Feynman Checkerboard as a Model of Discrete Space-Time.

This addresses space time on a checker board with single time units on one axis and a single space dimension on the other. There are only finite space units and time units, though ~small. The limiting velocity is 1. That is one space unit and one time unit. All speeds are this amount or less.

To travel below the max, you must travel less than one space unit in one time unit. But this is not possible as the space units are not divisible. But you can always travel several time units for one space unit.

This provides utility for t/d considerations. Or as presented in the original thread, torpidity.
 
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  • #2
Thread closed pending moderation.

Edit: The thread will remain closed. There is no point in discussing a quantity that is 1/speed and that no one will ever actually use.
 
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What is the relationship between speed, time, distance, and torpidity?

Speed, time, and distance are all interrelated concepts in physics. When we talk about speed, we are referring to how fast an object is moving. Time is the duration of the motion, and distance is the physical space that the object has covered. Torpidity, on the other hand, refers to a state of inactivity or sluggishness. In the context of the equation "speed = time/distance," torpidity can be interpreted as a decrease in speed due to factors such as friction or resistance.

How is the equation "speed = time/distance" used in scientific research?

The equation "speed = time/distance" is a fundamental formula in physics and is used in a wide range of scientific research. It is commonly used in kinematics to calculate the velocity of an object, as well as in fields such as fluid dynamics, astronomy, and engineering. By understanding the relationship between speed, time, and distance, scientists are able to make accurate predictions and analyze various phenomena.

Can the equation "speed = time/distance" be applied to all types of motion?

Yes, the equation "speed = time/distance" is a general formula that can be applied to all types of motion, including linear, circular, and projectile motion. However, it is important to note that the equation assumes constant speed and does not take into account factors such as acceleration or deceleration. In cases where an object's speed is changing, a more complex formula, such as the one for average speed, may need to be used.

How does torpidity affect an object's speed?

Torpidity can have a significant impact on an object's speed. When an object is in a state of torpidity, it becomes less active and is more resistant to motion. This can result in a decrease in speed, as the object encounters more obstacles and requires more energy to overcome them. Additionally, factors such as friction and air resistance can also contribute to a decrease in speed due to torpidity.

Are there any limitations or exceptions to the equation "speed = time/distance"?

While the equation "speed = time/distance" is a useful tool for calculating an object's speed, it does have its limitations and exceptions. As mentioned earlier, the equation assumes constant speed and does not account for factors such as acceleration or deceleration. Additionally, the equation may not be applicable in cases of non-uniform motion or when the object is moving in a curved path. In these cases, more advanced formulas, such as those used in calculus, may be necessary.

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