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What is a force?

  1. Jul 24, 2009 #1
    Hi

    When reading about forces I see two things.

    1. forces that act or do something.

    2. force as something that has power, like god, god is a force, or, an army is a force, or, police force.

    the "one" that acts has the same name as the act itself "force".


    Why is that?



    Thanks
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 24, 2009 #2

    cepheid

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    Hi.

    This is not really a physics question. The answer to your question is, "because the word force has multiple meanings in English."

    I hope this helps.
     
  4. Jul 24, 2009 #3

    tiny-tim

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    Hi eranb2! :smile:

    Each of those examples can also be called a power.

    But force and power have different meanings in physics.

    (Similarly, stress and strain have essentially the same meaning in ordinary English, but different meanings in physics.)

    The simple fact is that scientists naming something prefer to use an existing word, rather than invent one like chortle or wabe. :rolleyes:
     
  5. Jul 24, 2009 #4

    Dale

    Staff: Mentor

    Of course, there are exceptions, like "quark". But yes, I agree with you and cepheid
     
  6. Jul 24, 2009 #5
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quark_(cheese [Broken])

    quark is a type of cheese. I think this is incidental though.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  7. Jul 24, 2009 #6
    so does this mean everything is made of cheese?

    I dont understand

    :D
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  8. Jul 24, 2009 #7

    russ_watters

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    The point is that the OP is using words that have different meanings in different contexts. But this is "Physics Forums", so the relevant context is the scientific one. In that context, most of what the OP said is just gibberish.

    Thread locked.
     
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