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What is a quantum fluctuation

  1. Dec 9, 2015 #1

    wolram

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    What is a quantum fluctuation and how do they form a seed for black holes?:
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 9, 2015 #2
    Quantum fluctuations are simply a variation in the vacuum energy of a point in space.

    As far as I know, black holes are formed by the accumulation of mass. Once a critical amount is acquired within a specific region of space the mass collapses to form a black hole.

    There are theories about the possibility of micro-black holes, but no one has observed/detected any and it is simply a theory.
     
  4. Dec 9, 2015 #3

    wolram

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    I thought it was big bang, plasma, quantum fluctuation, black hole, or some form of creation from a QF.
     
  5. Dec 9, 2015 #4

    PeterDonis

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    Can you give a reference that describes a specific model of primordial black hole creation from quantum fluctuations?
     
  6. Dec 10, 2015 #5

    wolram

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    No Peter i can not, but from what i can find out in the literature, by my understanding, is that a quantum fluctuation is the seed for producing massive bodies, i am still looking for confirmation.

    https://www.newscientist.com/article/dn16095-its-confirmed-matter-is-merely-vacuum-fluctuations/

    I have found this article that states that matter is all quantum fluctuations.

    And this article on primordial black holes.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Primordial_black_hole


    According to the Big Bang Model, during the first few moments[clarification needed] after the Big Bang, pressure and temperature were extremely high. Under these conditions, simple fluctuations in the density of matter may have resulted in local regions dense enough to create black holes. Although most regions of high density would be quickly dispersed by the expansion of the universe, a primordial black hole would be stable, persisting to the present.
     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2015
  7. Dec 10, 2015 #6

    PeterDonis

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    First, this article gives no references to actual peer-reviewed papers, which is always a red flag. You need to find some actual papers.

    Second, the actual models described in the article, as far as I can tell (without having a link to an actual paper), do not say that "matter is all quantum fluctuations". They only say that most of the mass of, say, a proton is due to the energy associated with virtual particle fluctuations, not the mass of the valence quarks that make up the proton. But the valence quarks are certainly there, and they are not just "fluctuations", and the model does not say otherwise. "Matter is merely vacuum fluctuations" is typical New Scientist exaggeration.

    These fluctuations are not quantum fluctuations; they're just ordinary thermal fluctuations, the same as happen in any piece of matter with a finite temperature.
     
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