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What is a quark diagram?

  1. Jun 13, 2009 #1
    Self-explaining question... Thanks.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 13, 2009 #2

    malawi_glenn

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    in which context?
     
  4. Jun 13, 2009 #3
    As an alternative to Feynman diagrams (?), or so I heard...

    It doesn't sound ok, right?
     
  5. Jun 13, 2009 #4

    malawi_glenn

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    no then it just means a feynman diagram "on quark level" eg. beta decay

    http://www.antonine-education.co.uk/Physics_AS/Module_1/Topic_5/Feynmann_2.gif [Broken]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  6. Jun 13, 2009 #5
    It seems reasonable... Thanks man
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  7. Jun 13, 2009 #6
    Maybe the double line formalism ?
     
  8. Jan 25, 2010 #7
    I believe that they are a subclass of Feynman diagrams that do not show intermediate bosonic interactions; i.e. the relevant Feynman diagrams without any wiggly lines. The advantage is that any diagram with a continuous gap between the quarks is forbidden (suppressed) by Zweig's rule (iirc) and also that as flavour changing is relatively uncommon the lines often are just solid and 'simples'. Also, you don't have a whole infinity of gluons to worry about!
     
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