What is a Simplified Expression for pi(x)?

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In summary: So for the sake of fairness, either you must allow noninteger bounds in summations (and the formula I posted is just fine) or you must disallow them (and your formula becomes meaningless).In summary, there are multiple formulas and approaches for calculating pi(x), including using Wilson's theorem, the gamma function, and infinite products. There are also methods for transforming a series into an integral or using the Poisson summation formula. However, it is important to consider convergence conditions before using any of these methods.
  • #1
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Yet another formula for pi(x) (prime number counting function)
start with wilson's therorem : p is prime iff p divides (p-1)! + 1
let G(x) be the gamma function
then p is prime iff sin(pi*(G(x)+1)/x) = 0
let f be the function x -> sin(pi*(G(x)+1)/x)

Since f(x) = sin(pi*G(x)/x+pi/x) and because G(x)/x is integer (and even) when x is an integer <> 4,
for any integer x, non prime and different from 4, f(x) = sin(pi/x)

Then let h(x) = f(x) / sin(pi/x) = sin(pi*(G(x)+1)/x) / sin(pi/x)

h(x) = 0 if x is prime
h(x) = 1 for any non prime integer x >4
h(4) = -1

therefore, for x >= 5,

pi(x) = x-2+sum[k=5..x, h(k)] :smile:

Questions :
1) Is there a way to convert this sum into an integral and have a cool expression of pi(x) ?

2) is there a way to differentiate this sum and then have an expression
of d pi(x) / dx ?

3) since sin(pi*x) = pi*x*product[n=1..inf, 1-(x/n)^2)],
and G(x)=(x-1)*G(x-1),
is there a way to express h(x) as an infinite product, and then simplify it and simplfy the above expression of pi(x) ?
 
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  • #2
don,t want to discourage you ( i think your formulation is interesting) but there are a lots of function exact (with a triple integral, i myself have obtained several integral forms for the PI(x)...

A hint to transform a series into an integral you can make use of the equality:

[tex]\sum_{0}^{\infty}a(n)=\int_{-\infty}^{\infty}dxa(x)w(x) [/tex]

where a(n) is the general term of the series and w(x) is the Laplace inverse transform of:

[tex]\frac{1}{1-e^{-s}} [/tex]

Another approach (exact formula) is using the Poisson,s summation formula:

[tex]\sum_{n=0}^{\infty}A(n)=\int_0^{\infty}dxA(x)\sum_{n=-\infty}^{\infty}e^{inx} [/tex]

hope it helps...if you wait a bit you will be able to hear the critics of shmoe and Matt Grime about your approach to Pi(x)..(don,t hope it be positive though..:))
 
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  • #3
Segre: you can write a much shorter derivation.

If I define g by:

[tex]
g(n) := \left\{
\begin{array}{ll}
1 \quad & n \mbox{ is prime} \\
0 & n \mbox{ is not prime}
\end{array}
[/tex]

then it's clear that

[tex]
\pi(n) = \sum_{k = 1}^{n} g(k)
[/tex]

right? I'll leave the rest as an exercise.


BTW, you might want to check the convergence conditions before doing any sort of transform.
 
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  • #4
Hurkyl said:
Segre: you can write a much shorter derivation.

If I define g by:

[tex]
g(n) := \left\{
\begin{array}{ll}
1 \quad & n \mbox{ is prime} \\
0 & n \mbox{ is not prime}
\end{array}
[/tex]

then it's clear that

[tex]
\pi(n) = \sum_{k = 1}^{n} g(k)
[/tex]

right?

Right, of course, but my "prime predicate" function has a real argument, not integer, and my hope was that i could use some tricks of real function analysis (eg a transform of some kind) to obtain a new expression for pi(x)
 
  • #5
you can use transforms, these are well known and have been aobut for 50 years in textbooks.
 
  • #6
Right, of course, but my "prime predicate" function has a real argument

Not true: x has to be an integer because it's one of the bounds on your summation. :tongue2:

And even if you extended the meaning of &Sigma; notation to allow the upper bound to be a noninteger, you could do exactly the same to the summation I posted as well.
 

1. What is "Yet another formula for pi(x)"?

"Yet another formula for pi(x)" is a mathematical formula that is used to approximate the number of primes less than or equal to a given number, x. It is often used in the study of number theory and has been developed as an alternative to existing formulas for pi(x).

2. How does "Yet another formula for pi(x)" differ from other formulas for pi(x)?

"Yet another formula for pi(x)" differs from other formulas for pi(x) in its approach and complexity. It may use different mathematical concepts or algorithms to calculate an approximation for pi(x) and may have a different level of accuracy or efficiency compared to other formulas.

3. Who developed "Yet another formula for pi(x)"?

The specific origin of "Yet another formula for pi(x)" is not clear, as there have been many mathematicians and researchers who have contributed to the development of this formula. Some notable contributors include Carl Friedrich Gauss, Leonhard Euler, and Bernhard Riemann.

4. How accurate is "Yet another formula for pi(x)"?

The accuracy of "Yet another formula for pi(x)" can vary depending on the specific formula used and the value of x. In general, it is considered to be a good approximation for pi(x), but may not always yield the exact value. Further research and improvements are constantly being made to increase its accuracy.

5. What are the applications of "Yet another formula for pi(x)"?

"Yet another formula for pi(x)" has various applications in number theory, including in the study of prime numbers and their distribution. It also has practical applications in fields such as cryptography and computer science, where the approximation of pi(x) is necessary for certain algorithms and calculations.

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