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What is irrotational flow?

  1. Feb 11, 2005 #1
    All the math based texts just simply derive or state curl(U)=0 but what does this physically mean?

    Does it mean that a single fluid element does not rotate?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 11, 2005 #2

    dextercioby

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  4. Feb 11, 2005 #3

    Gokul43201

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    I suspect a good intro to superfluidity will cover this nicely ... let me check if I've got something bookmarked.
     
  5. Feb 11, 2005 #4

    dextercioby

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    I would suspect an equivalent term for it would be:"laminar flow".

    But that's just terminology.The basic idea behind is relevant.

    Daniel.

    EDIT:It would be really dull,if i wasn't wrong from time to time,huh...? :tongue2:
     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2005
  6. Feb 11, 2005 #5

    arildno

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    There is no connection between the concepts "laminar flow" and "irrotational flow".
    Couette flow is certainly laminar, but not at all irrotational.
    Irrotational means what it says: the local angular velocity at a point is zero.

    EDIT: Yes, I think I would yawn myself to death if you were right all the time..:wink:
    (Possibly, that's what I ought to do, anyways?? :confused:)
     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2005
  7. Feb 11, 2005 #6
    I thought so, thanks.
     
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