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What is Mbh really?

  1. Sep 28, 2004 #1
    What is "Mbh" really?

    Okay, this might sound stupid, but what does the "M" in Mbtu stand for? I know what it means, 1,000 x btu, but how would you say it? "_ British Thermal Units" Someone asked me and I really don't know.
     
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  3. Sep 28, 2004 #2

    chroot

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    Hmm.. how about many British Thermal Units? :wink:

    I don't really know.

    - Warren
     
  4. Sep 28, 2004 #3

    Gokul43201

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    I'm not sure if this has been settled one way or the other.

    Sometimes mBTU is used for Million BTUs or 10^6 BTUs. However, others use the notation mmBTU for this and mBTU (consequently) gets used for 1000 BTUs.
     
  5. Sep 28, 2004 #4

    Gokul43201

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    Why does your title say "Mbh" ?
     
  6. Sep 28, 2004 #5
    Abbreviated form of the same thing (I think). One of the guys I work with thinks it is just the roman numeral for 1000. Could this be?
     
  7. Sep 28, 2004 #6
    :smile: It surprises me you didn't know.
     
  8. Sep 28, 2004 #7

    Gokul43201

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    Why doesn't the world just stick with SI ??? Sometimes, I really can't stand this BTU - KWHr (and foot-pounds to Newton-meters and psi to pascals and all the rest of it) conversion b@!!$#!t :mad:

    Could 'm' be from 'millenius' for 1000 ? Perhaps, but I doubt it.

    I think it's more likely that the Brits first used the 'mBTU' for a million BTUs (for energy consumption in iron and steel plants and such)...long before they could conceive of a need for a symbol representing 1000BTUs ! Then one day someone came along and demanded a symbol for 1000 BTUs. If they had gone with the standard M=10^6, K=10^3, they would have simply suggested kBTUs. But instead they decided to use 'mm' for million, and use the 'm' for 1000 instead.

    That's my theory and I'm sticking to it.
     
  9. Sep 28, 2004 #8

    russ_watters

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    M is the Roman numeral prefix for 1000 and an MBH is 1000 Btu/hr.
     
  10. Sep 28, 2004 #9

    Gokul43201

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    Damn, there goes my beautiful theory ! :grumpy:

    Now what was it that Evo's signature said ??
     
  11. Sep 16, 2008 #10
    Re: What is "Mbh" really?

    It absolutely is simply the same as the roman numeral used as (1,000 times (x))
     
  12. Sep 16, 2008 #11

    mgb_phys

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    Re: What is "Mbh" really?

    Then remember that in English speaking countries it's a unit of energy, but in the USA it's a unit of power.
     
  13. Sep 16, 2008 #12
    Re: What is "Mbh" really?

    Thanks for the responses on this guys. I hadn't checked back for awhile.
     
  14. Sep 17, 2008 #13
    Re: What is "Mbh" really?

    maybe you should ask why didn't the world stick with Btus and pounds...I'm pretty sure they were here first ;)

    by the way, it took me a long time to get to the bottom of the BTU per kWhr - 3412, 3413, 3415... etc. There are different conversion values because there are different BTUs - the heat needed to raise a pound of water one degree depends on the temperature you start at: 50F or 68F or 38 F or....

    Now maybe that's a good answer to the question, maybe that's why the world didn't stick with Btus and pounds.

    Oh, and I've been at this for a long time and MBtu is *always* a million (10^6) Btus. At least around here, anyway...
     
  15. Sep 17, 2008 #14

    mgb_phys

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    Re: What is "Mbh" really?

    Customary units make perfect sense in the areas they were invented in, it's much easier to estimate how many BTU needed for a certain size water boiler starting at a certain temperature than to work in kg and lookup the heat capacity and density. But it doesn't follow that it makes sense to use BTU to calcuate the energy of a battery.

    Similairly an acre (being the area one ox can plough in one day) is a perfect unit for working out how many ox you will need - but doesn't make sense in chip design.

    Astronomers do the same thing now, working in astronomical units and solar masses rather than m and kg.
     
  16. Sep 17, 2008 #15

    russ_watters

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    Re: What is "Mbh" really?

    Four years is a long time to wait...
     
  17. Sep 17, 2008 #16

    Redbelly98

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    Re: What is "Mbh" really?

    Is it really considered a unit of power? I just thought people dropped the "per hour" out of laziness or something like that.
     
  18. Sep 18, 2008 #17

    mgb_phys

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    Re: What is "Mbh" really?

    I have only come accross it in the USA to mean BTU (per hour)
    But what can expect form a country that doesn't play cricket and can't spell colour! :rolleyes:
     
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2008
  19. Sep 18, 2008 #18

    russ_watters

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    Re: What is "Mbh" really?

    Its both, and yes, it's pretty much a matter of laziness, simplification.
     
  20. Sep 18, 2008 #19

    Redbelly98

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    Re: What is "Mbh" really?

    I suppose it's the same as saying "I was driving 10 miles over the speed limit". The "per hour" is assumed, out of our consistent (in USA) use of mph for units of car speed. But I've never heard anyone actually say that a mile can be a unit of velocity.

    Sir, since you have abandoned this perfectly good measurement system for metric, you gave up all rights to dictate how it is used! :grumpy:
     
  21. Sep 18, 2008 #20

    russ_watters

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    Re: What is "Mbh" really?

    I'd say your analogy is correct and that with BTUs, it just became somewhat formalized. Functionally, it is the same, though: the correct term is derived from the context.

    Sorta like (spoken) two, to, too or (written) saw.
     
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