What is the calculated mass of a post supernovae star

  • Thread starter taylordnz
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  • #1
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if you have a three solar mass star then it eneters into supernovae, how much mass is lost into space?
 

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  • #2
Labguy
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taylordnz said:
if you have a three solar mass star then it eneters into supernovae, how much mass is lost into space?
Most 3Ms stars would (without a companion) puff off outer layers during the giant phases and not go supernova at all.

If one did (could), there is no way to answer the question without more specifics since there are two main types of supernovae and several subclasses under each. Depends on the whole evolution, chemical composition, initial mass, etc. thing.
 
  • #3
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again?

a three solar mass star is the lowest limit for supernovae, for my research paper i need stats on how much matter is lost at any possible way?
 
  • #4
Labguy
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taylordnz said:
a three solar mass star is the lowest limit for supernovae, for my research paper i need stats on how much matter is lost at any possible way?
You may be thinking of the 3.2 Ms upper limit for a neutron star or any stellar remnant above which that mass must collapse to a black hole.

But, remember that this is the mass remaining after all the other evolutionary stages have occurred. In general, a "normal" star going Type-II supernova has an original mass in excess of 8.0 Ms when on the main sequence. Also but, there is no such thing as an "in general" star; too many variables.
 
  • #5
Supernova Mass

Perhaps it is pertinent for us all to consider the latitudinal coordinates purely from the fragmented distribution of secondary prismatic deflections - interdependent of the physical location - in that they are in proximity to the centre line on the equator. The 3.2 Ms upper limit is certainly close to the upper limit of a neutron star and also alludes to the average I.Q. of the people who attend Run DMC concerts or Anthony Robbins seminars.
I am very interested in opinions as to whether the mass of the supernova is inversely proportional to the acceleration of a bucket of lobster innards - in a clockwise direction across the upper stratosphere of a parallel universe.

DR PINKLINE JONES
Australia's Leading Social Critic
 
  • #6
Labguy
Science Advisor
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Pinkline Jones said:
Perhaps it is pertinent for us all to consider the latitudinal coordinates purely from the fragmented distribution of secondary prismatic deflections - interdependent of the physical location - in that they are in proximity to the centre line on the equator. The 3.2 Ms upper limit is certainly close to the upper limit of a neutron star and also alludes to the average I.Q. of the people who attend Run DMC concerts or Anthony Robbins seminars.
I am very interested in opinions as to whether the mass of the supernova is inversely proportional to the acceleration of a bucket of lobster innards - in a clockwise direction across the upper stratosphere of a parallel universe.

DR PINKLINE JONES
Australia's Leading Social Critic
I think that average IQ is inversely proportional to the number of 50 cent, BS phrases posted in the quote above. Therefore, since that number is so very high, the IQ of the poster must be dragging right at about 3.2, which is also the maximum limiting mass of a neutron star and ~ equal to the IQ of a snail. However, if the relationship is not a straight-line function, then the number of 1.44 (Chandra's limit) might be closer to actual.
 
  • #7
You make a very interesting OBSERVATION (dang me that fiftieth beer!!), not to me - perhaps your mum or "special friend" who live on your peculiar planet. But unfortunately, you're way off the mark as would be expected of an anal lint salesman masquerading as an expert on all matters SNAIL. I'm well aware of Chandra's limit and he'll use his doosra when the time is right but like Stephen Hawking in the 100m hurdles - you're bound to come a cropper when dealing with Australia's leading social ciritic and preeminent barfly.

...I'M PINKLINE JONES a.l.s.c.
 

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