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What is the difference?

  1. Apr 19, 2004 #1
    I am puzzled about the defference between visual c++ and c++. I know that c++ has the portability and all so if you know c++ how is it related to visual c++? Is visual c++ mostly for online apps? Would visual basic be better for desktop applications? Is the smart certify direct course for visual c++ good?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 19, 2004 #2
    Cipher, I honestly wish I could help you, but I can't. Actually, I'm replying because I've had that same question lingering in my head since August of 2003. I have started learning about Visual Basic, but I don't know anything about C++ or Visual C++ other than the fact that my Programming instructor told me that they're different. I hope some knowledgable members reply...
     
  4. Apr 19, 2004 #3

    dduardo

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    C++ is the actual language. Visual C++ is just the name Microsoft gave to its c++ development environment.

    Btw, Microsoft's c++ compiler stinks. Use either gcc or intel's compiler.
     
  5. Apr 19, 2004 #4
    I'm sure your opinion is completely unbiased.

    Seriously, all three (Microsoft, Intel, GCC) are good compilers. All three have their strengths; Microsoft is good for win32 development; Intel is good for compiling code for Intel processors; and GCC is platform-independent.

    Depending on what features are important to you, any one of them can be used. Or all of them, if you avoid compiler extensions.
     
  6. Apr 19, 2004 #5

    dduardo

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    No, I'm being, serious. I've had numerous issues with Microsoft's compiler not doing the right thing. One thing I can name off the top of my head is improper handling of scope. Another is nested templates I'm sure many people who have used visual studios in the past and present can atest to this. What microsoft likes to do is throw in there non-standard junk into the compiler and its breaks stuff. They do the same thing in Internet Explorer.
     
  7. Apr 19, 2004 #6
    I've had problems with Intels compiler optimizing code from slow and working to fast and not working. I'm continually handed "standard ANSI" C++ by people at my University who obviously have never used anything but gcc, since they seem to think think gcc extensions are less non-standard than MS extensions.

    The nested templates is one of the most glaring issues with the MS compiler, although the scope handling is no longer the issue it one was. Their code generators in VC++ will generate non-standard code, but that's an issue with their IDE and not their compiler.
     
  8. Apr 21, 2004 #7
    i want to start writing the ANSI codes, i think in linux you can use QT for that but how do i do it in windows and will the compilers listed above will work.
     
  9. Apr 21, 2004 #8

    dduardo

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    Cipher I think your confused with the lingo. ANSI is an organization that creates standards. (http://www.ansi.org/) In the case of c/c++ a committe has outlined how compilers should behave. QT is basically a gui library and not related with ANSI.. (http://www.trolltech.com/products/qt/index.html)

    QT is a multiplatform library, meaning it will run on windows, linux, mac os X, etc. If you don't know how to use multi-threaded libraries in c/c++, then don't bother trying to do gui stuff right away. Get the basics down with command line, learn how to build classes and templates. You must be very comfortable with OOP (Object oriented programming) to do gui stuff in c++.
     
  10. Apr 21, 2004 #9
    Agree with dduardo...I've also trouble with the VC++ :frown:
    One can remember now:

    In the for loop....the incrementing index varible gives global scope which is not a very good thing :)
     
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