What is the force of a shockwave expanding 100 fps in fluid

In summary, the force of a fluid shock wave traveling at 100 fps can be calculated using the equation Force = density x area x velocity2, and the rate of degradation would depend on various factors related to the medium and projectile.
  • #1
Aqeous
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I posted a few days ago . . . I think the point of my question has been missed. It was generally about ballistics. I elected not to go into any specifics because this is a physics forum not the FiringLine forum.

So, I will specify and simplify . . .

Here is my question. If a sphere is traveling at 1000 fps, according to my data, when it hits a fluid-like medium, (ballistics gel) the shock wave that it imparts on that medium is 1/10 the velocity of the actual projectile. (I acquired this information from a very reputable source.)

My question is simply this: what is the force (in pounds per square inch) of a fluid shock wave traveling at 100 fps.
Also: for the more advanced math expert (if it is at all possible) I would also like to know how quickly such a shock wave would degrade at about 1' from the center of impact.

Can anyone out there help me with this?
 
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  • #2
I am new to this field and would like to understand what is going on. The force of a fluid shock wave traveling at 100 fps can be calculated by using the equation:Force = density x area x velocity2 where density is the density of the medium (the ballistics gel), area is the area of the sphere, and velocity is the velocity of the shock wave (100 fps). For example, if the density of the ballistics gel is 1000 kg/m3 and the area of the sphere is 0.01 m2, then the force of the shock wave would be 1000 x 0.01 x 1002 = 1000000 N/m2, or 1000 kPa. To calculate the rate of degradation of the shock wave at 1' from the center of impact, you would need to know the precise physical characteristics of the medium (such as viscosity) as well as other factors such as the size of the sphere and the type of material it is made of. Without this information, it would not be possible to accurately calculate the rate of degradation.
 
  • #3


The force of a shock wave expanding at 100 fps in a fluid medium would depend on several factors such as the density and compressibility of the fluid, the shape and size of the projectile, and the distance from the center of impact. It is not possible to give a specific answer without knowing these details. However, in general, the force of a shock wave can be calculated using the equation F = ρv^2, where ρ is the density of the fluid and v is the velocity of the shock wave.

As for the rate of degradation of the shock wave at 1' from the center of impact, this would also depend on the factors mentioned above and may require more complex calculations. It would also be affected by the type of medium the shock wave is traveling through. For example, a shock wave traveling through water would degrade faster than one traveling through air.

It is important to note that ballistics and shock waves are complex subjects and the calculations involved can be quite advanced. It would be best to consult with a ballistics expert or a physicist with expertise in this area for a more accurate and detailed answer to your question.
 

1. What causes a shockwave to expand in fluid?

A shockwave is created when an object moves through a fluid at a speed faster than the speed of sound. This creates a sudden increase in pressure, which propagates outwards as a wave.

2. How is the force of a shockwave measured?

The force of a shockwave is typically measured in pounds per square inch (psi) or newtons per square meter (N/m²). This measures the amount of pressure exerted by the shockwave on a specific area of the fluid.

3. Does the force of a shockwave change as it expands?

Yes, the force of a shockwave decreases as it expands in a fluid. This is because the energy of the shockwave is spread out over a larger area, resulting in a decrease in pressure and force.

4. How does the speed of a shockwave affect its force?

The force of a shockwave is directly proportional to its speed. This means that as the speed of the shockwave increases, so does its force on the surrounding fluid.

5. Can the force of a shockwave be controlled?

Yes, the force of a shockwave can be controlled by adjusting the speed and shape of the object moving through the fluid. Additionally, the properties of the fluid itself, such as density and viscosity, can also affect the force of a shockwave.

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