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Admissions What is the letter of recommendation?

  1. Nov 28, 2017 #41

    symbolipoint

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    Grands must now be better informed and if he goes to attend an undergraduate program at an Italian university, he should at least do some nice lab work and do well. He may then be in a better position to earn a possible letter of recommendation or two, or three, from there; and be able to include them in his application package when applying for admission to a graduate program. He will need to determine what he wants to study more specifically later than what he is able to choose at present. Grands, you may want to find some academic research to do for someone or also look for an internship which you may later qualify for.
     
  2. Nov 28, 2017 #42

    mathwonk

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    I gave you a link to Professor Alberto Collino of Torino who took his PhD at MIT in US, and here is another, Profesor Enrico Arbarello of Universita La Sapienza Roma, who took his PhD at Columbia in US. Here is another, Professor Giuseppe Ceresa, who took his PhD at Utah in US. There is also Paolo Aluiffi now at Florida State in the US who took the PhD at Brown in US.

    http://www1.mat.uniroma1.it/people/arbarello/Curriculum.html

    http://didattica.uniroma2.it/docenti/curriculum/3806-Giuseppe-Ceresa-Genet

    https://www.math.fsu.edu/~aluffi/
     
    Last edited: Nov 28, 2017
  3. Nov 29, 2017 #43
    Maybe that is something for people that come from other countries.

    We don't have: letter of recommendation, letter of motivation, academic transcript, SAT, ACT, Portfolio.

    That site is not an official university web site, if you want to know what you need to entry in a italian university you can check here http://www.unimi.it/ENG/admission/29528.htm
     
  4. Nov 29, 2017 #44

    symbolipoint

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    Forum members and other visitors on the forum, as you read what is in that site, notice that much of what Grands has been told (from members participating in his many forum topics) is very consistent with what is read in that site. There ARE some entrance requirements, including for undergraduate admissions. Not yet clear about "transcripts", but I will guess that transcripts will be found to be part of the necessary proof of eligibility for admission to their undergraduate programs.
     
  5. Nov 29, 2017 #45

    symbolipoint

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    One of the requirements for entrance to programs and courses seems to be tests for qualifications. This would, one would guess, be in addition to transcripts - like, transcripts of previous work alone is not enough to allow the student to be in a program or course; but passing certain tests is the requirements.
     
  6. Nov 29, 2017 #46
    We have test in some courses like Veterinary, and Architecture, cause there are limitate places of work for people that can work in the public sector.
    There are no limits for engineering, physics, maths, Literature, Law, Philosophy and more etc....
    Some of this university have tests but you don't have to pass it, is just a test for you, to understand if you are able to study that kind of subject, but you can join the university in any case.
     
  7. Nov 29, 2017 #47

    symbolipoint

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    Wow! Yah, right! Good luck on that second part. I still do not really believe it. You might try that and report back to us how it went. To be more secure about what is in fact the true situation, ask for counseling advice from the universities at which you wish to attend.
     
  8. Nov 29, 2017 #48

    TeethWhitener

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    Just as a general note, much of what @Grands is saying seems to check out in terms of admission to undergraduate programs at Italian universities. The requirements seem to be: 1) high school diploma (or equivalent), 2) occasionally a transcript requirement, and 3) an admissions test (sometimes competitive, sometimes not, depending on the program of study). Some universities also have language proficiency requirements, but many seem to offer the option to study in English or Italian.

    See, e.g.,
    http://en.uniroma1.it/study-us/undergraduate/admissions/second-cycle
    http://www.unimi.it/ENG/admission/31190.htm
    http://www.unibo.it/en/teaching/degree-programmes/programme/2017/8007

    This leniency in admissions requirements leads to large universities. For instance, the University of Milan enrolls ~60,000 students (edit: Bologna has ~80k students and Rome Sapienza has >110k...yowza!). This is bigger than any US university (UCF is #1 with ~55k enrollees).

    Needless to say, the post-secondary education landscape in Italy is quite different from that of the US (and probably much of the rest of the world), and much of the advice that we would give to a college-bound student in the US is likely not to be applicable to @Grands 's situation. My suggestion would be to make friends with the guidance counselor, but then again, I don't know if Italy has guidance counseling that's comparable to what's seen in the US.
     
  9. Nov 29, 2017 #49

    symbolipoint

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    TeethWhitener
    Thanks for trying to explain some of the differences from other places' systems.
     
  10. Nov 29, 2017 #50
    I'm 100% sure.
    We don't have admission test for 80% of undergraduate degree.
    The only courses that have ones are the ones I wrote before, and that courses don't have a master degree, them are single courses of 5-6 years.
     
  11. Nov 29, 2017 #51
    We don't have a guidance counseling.

    The test is based on very simply mathematical questions, like trigonometry, thing that almost anyone who went to high school know.
    Like I said before you don't have to pass it.
     
    Last edited: Nov 29, 2017
  12. Nov 29, 2017 #52
    Many here have found at least some aspects of Grands accounts of the Italian education system to be not credible. But I'd like to point out that I graduated high school in Massachusetts in the early '70s. If I recall correctly after all these decades, the policy then was that any student who graduated from a Massachusetts high school was guaranteed admission into U. of Mass. You still had to submit a formal application and receive a formal acceptance, but acceptance was guaranteed. It was the ultimate "safety" school, and our guidance officers told us all to apply even if we were confident of getting accepted to better schools. I no longer live there and don't know whether that policy still holds.
     
    Last edited: Nov 29, 2017
  13. Nov 29, 2017 #53

    mathwonk

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    Indeed, I seem to recall that in the 1980's one of my Italian friends said that students often registered at laSapienza just to be able to eat at the presumably heavily subsidized cafeteria, but with no interest in completing a course of study.
     
  14. Nov 29, 2017 #54

    mathwonk

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    The whole system was somewhat eccentric. The university librarians' union was very powerful and forced the closure of the research library daily at noon. Even though I was a university researcher I was obliged to quit the library and continue my research at home in the afternoon.
     
  15. Nov 29, 2017 #55

    mathwonk

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    In spite of some eccentricities, there are excellent faculty members in the Italian system, from whom one could certainly learn a lot. All the professors I listed above are internationally recognized experts in algebraic geometry. Another such is Professor Van Geemen, who appears in the second link from Teethwhitener as Head of studies in mathematics at Univ of Milano. He is originally from Holland but has been in residence in Italy for some time. So the Italian system also attracts experts from abroad.
     
  16. Nov 30, 2017 #56

    donpacino

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    In the link you posted there is a section for passing year 2 and 1 tests, which replaces the sat and act.
    A portfolio is simply a collection of the work you have done. many colleges in the US don't require it either, but it can help you get in. Even if an Italian university doesn't require it, you might consider making one. Same with your transcript. If they arent required for application and no one ever submits them, then you really shouldn't even be asking for advice, because apparently you can get into any itallian university by passing high school.
     
  17. Nov 30, 2017 #57
    Grands' lead-off post concerned application to a UK university. Most of his questions stem from major differences between practices in Italy and practices in other countries, should he decide to apply outside of Italy.
     
  18. Nov 30, 2017 #58

    symbolipoint

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    Grands's question here seems to be answered now. The thing he would consider now, is what might he do between now (still in high school) and the time of preparing his application package for a UK university, so that someone (boss, supervisor, manager, teacher) will know enough about his work and habits to be able to write a letter of recommendation.
     
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