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A What is the Lorentz time transformation?

  1. Dec 26, 2016 #1
    ##t'=\gamma(t-xv/c^2)##

    So, what is this?

    My attempt to resolve this problem.

    The transform of the spatial part is: ##x'=\gamma(x-vt)##

    therefore the light speed must be transformed to the:
    ##c'=\gamma(c-v)##

    additionaly: a light ray equatin is: x = ct, thus: x' = c't accordingly.

    But because the additionali relativistic assumption: c = inv,
    the light ray equation should be written in other way: x' = ct'

    Thus the relativity convence proposes nothing other but just that :
    ##c't = ct'##
    so, the relativistic convention c = inv, implies a time transform in the form:
    ##t'=c'/c t=\gamma(c-v)/c t=\gamma(1-v/c) t=\gamma(t-t v/c)##

    but: x = ct => t = x/c, thus somebody can use, replace the t by x/c:
    ##t'=\gamma(t- xv/c^2)##
    this is exactly the Lorentz's time transformation.
    It's an unrealistic - artificial thing only.
     
  2. jcsd
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