What is the temperature in a vacum?

  • Thread starter ArielGenesis
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In summary, you explain to kids that there is no vacuum by telling them that there is a space which is something, and then explaining that space alone is called vacuum space.
  • #1
ArielGenesis
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if i asked u guyz

what is the temperature in a vacum? (measured not using instrument)
you will answre there's none

but how can you explain it to primary student ^^ o:)
 
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  • #2
first tell that the temp. is zero, then tell them not to ask questions. :-p :-p
 
  • #3
How do you explain to the kids that there is no vacuum? Even in the farthest reaches of intergalactic space, it's 2.7 degrees Kelvin (that's without the wind-chill factor) just from the photon content.
 
  • #4
you tell them:

Try to imagen nothing. you see, there is nothing there. now, you are whatching a space with nothing. so there is a space, whihc is something. so, then it is not nothing. it is space alone. space alone is called: vacuum space.
 
  • #5
jimmysnyder, kid will say : just use a vacuum cleaner and u got a clean vacuum =p
yomamma, nice try ^^ but bad anwer
guille, you basically tell them nothing.

no but what i was thinking is that in my place, physics is quickly and unfairly assume as a theoritical subject of nudry bald proffesor, yet we know we are not.

and the only reason is that they don't understand the basic, try...
what is heat?
they will give out a tonnes of nonsense.
 
  • #6
Of course,

but why would you need to explain vacuum space to aprimary student?
 
  • #7
ArielGenesis said:
kid will say : just use a vacuum cleaner and u got a clean vacuum =p

If I explain to them that there is no such thing as a vacuum and they say "Oh yes there is', then how can I teach them anything at all?
 
  • #8
yeah, u right. that's the brain teasing part
u know, they are like idiots dummies n they r being spoon feed wit lots of formula without understanding the essence. n my question is actually, how to teach them the BASIC FIRST. like what is heat after all, if they don't understand, then they will make their own meanning of conduction which 99.9% wrong.
 
  • #9
ArielGenesis said:
they are like idiots dummies

You're a teacher, right?
 
  • #10
no I'm a student ^^ (high school)
 
  • #11
How do you explain to high school students that there is no vacuum? Even in the farthest reaches of intergalactic space, the temperature is 2.7 degrees Kelvin (that's without the wind-chill factor) just from the photon content.
 
Last edited:
  • #12
ArielGenesis said:
no I'm a student ^^ (high school)
*Huge sigh of relief* I was afraid you were trying to teach with that vocabulary/grammar/spelling ability... :biggrin:


"what is the temperature in a vacum? (measured not using instrument)"

"but how can you explain it to primary student"

Simple:
Once you explain the definition of 'temperature', they will accept the answer. Kids are not dumb. They may not have as much infomartion as adults, but once supplied with it, they are quite bright at incorporating it into their understanding.
 
  • #13
DaveC426913 said:
Huge sigh of relief

Sighed too soon. My kids' teachers are only marginally better at spelling and grammar and are aggressively defensive about it


DaveC426913 said:
Once you explain the definition of 'temperature', they will accept the answer. Kids are not dumb. They may not have as much infomartion as adults, but once supplied with it, they are quite bright at incorporating it into their understanding.

Congratulations, you solved the puzzle.
 

Related to What is the temperature in a vacum?

1. What is the definition of temperature in a vacuum?

The temperature in a vacuum is the measure of the average kinetic energy of the particles in the absence of any external pressure or atmosphere.

2. Is there a temperature in a vacuum?

Yes, there is a temperature in a vacuum. While there may not be any molecules or particles present, the vacuum itself still has a temperature, which can be measured and is typically close to absolute zero.

3. How is temperature affected in a vacuum?

In a vacuum, temperature is affected by the amount of energy present in the system. Without any external pressure or atmosphere, the temperature can fluctuate more easily and may reach extreme temperatures depending on the energy input.

4. What is the difference between temperature in a vacuum and temperature in air?

The main difference between temperature in a vacuum and temperature in air is the presence of molecules. In air, molecules are constantly colliding and transferring heat energy, whereas in a vacuum, there are no particles to transfer heat, resulting in a different temperature measurement.

5. Can temperature be measured accurately in a vacuum?

Yes, temperature can be measured accurately in a vacuum using specialized instruments such as thermocouples or radiation pyrometers. These instruments are designed to measure temperature without the need for physical contact or the presence of particles, making them suitable for vacuum environments.

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