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What is the temperature in a vacum?

  1. Apr 29, 2005 #1
    if i asked u guyz

    what is the temperature in a vacum? (measured not using instrument)
    you will answre there's none

    but how can you explain it to primary student ^^ o:)
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 29, 2005 #2

    JamesU

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    Gold Member

    first tell that the temp. is zero, then tell them not to ask questions. :tongue2: :tongue:
     
  4. Apr 29, 2005 #3
    How do you explain to the kids that there is no vacuum? Even in the farthest reaches of intergalactic space, it's 2.7 degrees Kelvin (that's without the wind-chill factor) just from the photon content.
     
  5. Apr 30, 2005 #4
    you tell them:

    Try to imagen nothing. you see, there is nothing there. now, you are whatching a space with nothing. so there is a space, whihc is something. so, then it is not nothing. it is space alone. space alone is called: vacuum space.
     
  6. May 1, 2005 #5
    jimmysnyder, kid will say : just use a vacum cleaner and u got a clean vacum =p
    yomamma, nice try ^^ but bad anwer
    guille, you basically tell them nothing.

    no but what i was thinking is that in my place, physics is quickly and unfairly assume as a theoritical subject of nudry bald proffesor, yet we know we are not.

    and the only reason is that they don't understand the basic, try...
    what is heat?
    they will give out a tonnes of nonsense.
     
  7. May 1, 2005 #6
    Of course,

    but why would you need to explain vacuum space to aprimary student?
     
  8. May 1, 2005 #7
    If I explain to them that there is no such thing as a vacuum and they say "Oh yes there is', then how can I teach them anything at all?
     
  9. May 2, 2005 #8
    yeah, u right. that's the brain teasing part
    u know, they are like idiots dummies n they r being spoon feed wit lots of formula without understanding the essence. n my question is actually, how to teach them the BASIC FIRST. like what is heat after all, if they dont understand, then they will make their own meanning of conduction which 99.9% wrong.
     
  10. May 2, 2005 #9
    You're a teacher, right?
     
  11. May 2, 2005 #10
    no i'm a student ^^ (high school)
     
  12. May 2, 2005 #11
    How do you explain to high school students that there is no vacuum? Even in the farthest reaches of intergalactic space, the temperature is 2.7 degrees Kelvin (that's without the wind-chill factor) just from the photon content.
     
    Last edited: May 2, 2005
  13. May 2, 2005 #12

    DaveC426913

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    Gold Member

    *Huge sigh of relief* I was afraid you were trying to teach with that vocabulary/grammar/spelling ability... :surprised :biggrin:


    "what is the temperature in a vacum? (measured not using instrument)"

    "but how can you explain it to primary student"

    Simple:
    Once you explain the definition of 'temperature', they will accept the answer. Kids are not dumb. They may not have as much infomartion as adults, but once supplied with it, they are quite bright at incorporating it into their understanding.
     
  14. May 2, 2005 #13
    Sighed too soon. My kids' teachers are only marginally better at spelling and grammar and are agressively defensive about it


    Congratulations, you solved the puzzle.
     
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