What makes you prouder?

  • Thread starter Blackberg
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  • #1
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Contributing work yourself or benefiting from a worker's contribution?
 

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  • #2
OldEngr63
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Its pretty hard to be proud when you are simply the beneficiary of the work of others (although I suppose that some are; they say it takes all kinds).
 
  • #3
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Contributing work yourself or benefiting from a worker's contribution?
Some very large companies establish even a team of several members for the so called "value realization" (values of both products and contribution from every single employee). Do you know how such "contribution" level is measured ?
I don't like "symbolic" behaviors or gestures (i.e an employee looks hard-working because he comes on time and leaves late but actually he sits there chatting with others or reading news, something like this I call "symbolic")
 
  • #4
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Obviously the 2nd one, stealing other people's work. It wasn't easy becoming a high-intrigue manipulative shite. You have no idea what I had to go thru to get here.

//bad joke finished.

Why exactly are you asking about this? What happened?
 
  • #5
Choppy
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I almost can't help but wonder if there's a language issue here.

Pride inherently implies satisfaction or general good feelings that derive from one's own accomplishments.

There are times when I take pride in the accomplishments of others. But that's when I see them succeed as a result of mentorship that I've given them. Examples might include pride in the artwork my children do, or pride when one of my students publishes a paper that I have mentored him through. But again that pride derives from my own actions. I don't feel that same sense of personal pride, if say, a student publishes a paper independent of our collaborative efforts (although I still feel hapy for that person).
 
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  • #6
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Some very large companies establish even a team of several members for the so called "value realization" (values of both products and contribution from every single employee). Do you know how such "contribution" level is measured ?
I don't like "symbolic" behaviors or gestures (i.e an employee looks hard-working because he comes on time and leaves late but actually he sits there chatting with others or reading news, something like this I call "symbolic")
That reminds me of the coffee cup carrying character in the Dilbert comic strip.
 
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