What no comments on the Iraq panel's report.

  1. The Iraq panel has spoken. Although Bush doesn't appear to be paying attention-(Washinton Post> Bush says he wants to consider strategies/policies other or differnt than those presented to him by the panel.) The panel's report appears to be concuring with what the majority of US citezens have made plain. This revisited Vietnam scenario and the incompetence behind the planning for this uncalled for conflict needs to be addressed and resolved. Preferably by level, intellegent, noncovetous tactics and new open-minded policies. I'm no expert but I would seek advice from the former Sec. of State Colin Powell for ways to (hopefully) gracefully exit Iraq. :cool:

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/12/07/AR2006120700162.html
     
  2. jcsd
  3. The report says that "Stay the course" isn't working. Big Whoop! Bush already cut and ran from that slogan a while ago. Their proposal for fixing things is "Israel should be wiped off the map". I wonder if we can get Ahmadinejad to go along with that.
     
  4. Of course the proposed peace agreement is synonymous with wiping Israel off the map to those who insist on Israel continuing to plunder what little is left of Palestine. However, those who respect human rights understand that we need to stand firm on the two state solution proposed in the Iraq panel if we ever want to be accepted as anything but a bunch of barbarous hypocrites.
     
  5. Hurkyl

    Hurkyl 16,089
    Staff Emeritus
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    Whether or not jimmysnyder's remark is warranted, your response is inappropriate. It is an ad hominem attack.
     
  6. Bringing an end to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict is synonymous with wiping Israel off the map to Ahmadinejad. If, in the process of looking for a way out of Iraq, we intend to bring Iran into the picture and we intend to bring the Israeli-Palestinian conflict into the picture, then only one conclusion can be drawn. I drew it.

    If it brings any comfort to you, I disagree with Israeli policy toward the Palestinians. However, I note that Israel would be tasked with providing the Palestinians a state out of land that was taken from Egypt and Jordan. While in the matter of Iraq we are cautioned against drawing artificial political lines in the sand, Israel is castigated for not doing so. Obviously it was and still is the job of Egypt and Jordan to create such a state, of course with the cooperation and aid of Israel. But whether Israel is willing to help is yet a moot point, Egypt and Jordan have not asked. I note that Jordan has officially rejected sovereignty over the West Bank, I have to admit, I do not know the status of Gaza with respect to Egypt. Any Palestinian (I assume you are one) knows well the duplicity of these two countries in the matter of their national aspirations.
     
    Last edited: Dec 8, 2006
  7. I am an American, but I know that Egypt, Jordan, and Iran all recognize Palestine as a state, as does much of the world to one extent or another; Israel being a notably flagrant exception. Regardless, I'm curious to know what set you off on your your Ahmadinejad spiel, as the topic here is the Iraqi panel report and best I can tell it mentions nothing of the sort.
     
  8. Please accept my apology. I have read previous posts of yours and made an unjustified assumption.

    In general, I cannot justify the mutual hypocrisy on display by all countries in the state recognition game. However, Palestine is not a state. I hope that this will change.

    I'm not sure what you are asking here. Nothing of what sort? However, the report certainly does mention the points I refered to:

    http://online.wsj.com/public/resources/documents/WSJ-iraq_study_group.pdf

    My post brought together these two parts of the report.

    I note that Ahmadinejad is the President of Iran and that he has called for Israel to be wiped off the map. My post tied in these facts as well. While they are not mentioned in the report, no effective analysis of the report can have value without bringing in facts from the real world.
    http://english.aljazeera.net/news/archive/archive?ArchiveId=15816
     
  9. Gaza was left under Israeli control in the Camp-David accords between Israel and Egypt.
     
  10. Did these countries recognize Palestine when it was in the Arab countries' hands?
     
  11. Kyleb, I'm sorry I didn't bring this up in my previous post, but as you had questioned the relevency of my post to the Baker report, I feel compelled to ask why you brought up the issue of recognition of Palestine. Recognition is not brought up in the Baker report. Is there a connection?
     
  12. The relevance is in the fact that you claimed "it was and still is the job of Egypt and Jordan to create such a state"; when in fact both nations are among the many that do recognize Palestine as a state and the pressing issue here is that Israel is continuing to colonize Palestinian land under force of military occupation. As for the Baker report, it most certainly did not suggest ""Israel should be wiped off the map" or anything of the sort, but rather quite plainly (and in what you quoted no less) insisted on the need for a two state solution. But then Ahmadinejad never actually call for Israel to be wiped off the map either, and Iran supports reaching a two state solution as well, but of course such facts can easily go unnoticed if you get your news from people who would rather seeing Palestinian land continue to be colonized under force of military occupation.

    And Yonoz, the declaration of statehood was in 1988.
     
  13. Israel wiped from the stage of time rather than wiped off the map. Now there is a distinction without a difference.
     
  14. The distinction is in the fact that he didn't say "Israel" but rather he said "the regime occupying Jerusalem"; and the difference is that Israel is a state rather than a regime.
     
  15. BobG

    BobG 2,368
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    There is a subtle difference and the dispute over 'map' vs 'time' clouds it.

    Ahmadinejad feels the current Israeli regime should be eliminated from the stage of time, not Israel. That would be similar to the US feeling Saddam Hussein needed to be eliminated, but wanting to preserve Iraq as a country.

    That's not to pretend Ahmadinejad isn't hostile to Israel, because he is hostile, dangerous to both Israel and US interests, and possibly dangerous to the Middle East in general. But, one interpretation presents Ahmadinejad as dangerous adversary that must be defended against. The other presents Ahmadinejad as a villain that has to be eliminated at any cost.

    The truth is that some sort of resolution that would be acceptable to both Israelis and Palestinians (if that's even possible) might provide an atmosphere in which the attitude of all Middle Eastern regimes would be drastically different than their current attitudes, which is what I think the Baker report was getting at. It's going to be hard to get any kind of Middle Eastern consensus on what to do about Iraq if they can't resolve the Israel-Palestine issues.

    Of course, that, too, could be interpreted two different ways: 1) "We need to resolve Israel-Palestine issues quickly", or 2) "Hah! You're dreaming if you think anyone in the Middle East will agree what to do about Iraq!"
     
  16. Not exactly. He did say Israel should be relocated to Europe. Are his various remarks to be understood in conjunction, or as unconnected?
    http://www.japantoday.com/jp/news/357868
     
  17. Jimmy, why do you countenue to distort the distinction between the Zionist regime and the state of Israel?
     
  18. Nice opinion pieces. I especially liked this guy's approach:
    I guess you don't need to mistranslate Farsi to fool people.

    Oh that's right, silly me. Why did they wait over 40 years? Did they not mind occupation by Arabs?
     
  19. How's that?
     
  20. Your source shows it hasn't:
     
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