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What would be its net charge after it has 1% of its electrons removed?

  • Thread starter pwise2682
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  • #1
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I already posted this but i think i may have a better idea how to do this.

Suppose 1.16g of pure gold has zero net charge. What would be its net charge after it has 1% of its electrons removed????

(1.16g/196.966 g/mol* 6.022E23* 1.602E-19 C) .99= 562.477 C

IS THAT RIGHT????
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
AKG
Science Advisor
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If you remove X electrons, you remove a charge of (-1.602E-19 C)x. If the net charge is initially zero, it ends up being (1.602E-19 C)x. x = 0.01N, where N is the total number of electrons. N = pq, where p is the number of electrons that a gold atom has, and q is the number of gold atoms in 1.16g of pure gold. q = (m/M)A, where m = 1.16g is the mass of the gold, M is the molar mass of gold, and A is Avogadro's number, 6.022E23. I have a feeling your calculation is wrong. For one, I don't know why you're multiplying by 0.99 (you should be multplying by one minus 0.99). Also, you don't take into account the fact that gold atoms have more than one electron.
 

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