What would happen with this configuration of static charge

In summary, the configuration given would create a small electric field with an outward force that would cause the internal charges to rotate around the axle.
  • #1
wiredGuy
14
0
What would happen given the following configuration?

http://img513.imageshack.us/img513/1474/apparatus.jpg

The External charge would be depressed slightly so that it does not touch the L body. The L body and external body would be made from a conductive material, and the external body would be sealed off on either end (that is it would be a closed cylinder). The Internal and External charges would carry the same charge. The "L-gap" would be wide enough to ensure there is always an External charge visible and the L body would be longer than the gap between the charges on the external body. The Internal body (everything except the external body and the external charge) are free to rotate around the axle.

In advance, forgive the silly names, I repeat that when I made this I was a lot younger.

Anyway, I've tried to figure out why this wouldn't work by figuring out what would happen. Please let me know where my thinking goes astray:

- Since the "Active Chamber" forms a Faraday cage with the external body and the L bodies, the area within it can be looked at in isolation. I remember testing whether or not the slight gap between the metal body constructing a Faraday cage eliminated the effect entirely and found the effect was minimal. (Correct me if the premise is completely off base).
- Looking at just the active chamber its easy to see that the L bodies would begin rotating as they are pushed away from the external charge. The external charges would place an outward pressure on the walls of the external body; however, if something was strong enough to resist their movement, they would just stay in place.
- When the l bodies are rotating they would create a magnetic field, this field would intern have a force applied to the moving internal charge. This force would be an outward force that makes the internal charges want to jump out of the active body towards the external body.

I don't know how to do the math to convince myself that there would be enough force generated for the IC to completely jump out of the internal body leaving it without charge. I intuitively would be surprised by this since I remember reading about how much energy it takes before charge jumps through space to get from one place to another.. not to mention the fact that the external charge would oppose their movement.
 
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  • #2
So, my best guess is that the internal charges would be repelled by the external charge, but not enough to make them jump out of the active body. Instead, they would remain inside the active body and rotate around the axle.
 
  • #3


Based on the given configuration, it seems that the external charge would be repelled by the L bodies and would be pushed towards the walls of the external body. This would create a strong outward pressure on the walls of the external body, but if they are strong enough to resist this pressure, the external charge would remain in place.

Meanwhile, the L bodies would start to rotate due to the repulsion from the external charge. This rotation would create a magnetic field, which would in turn exert a force on the internal charge. This force would be an outward force, pushing the internal charge towards the walls of the internal body.

If the internal body is sealed off on both ends, the internal charge would be trapped inside and would continue to experience this outward force. However, if the internal body is open at one end, the internal charge may eventually escape and jump towards the external body. This would result in the internal body losing its charge and becoming neutral.

It is difficult to determine the exact amount of force generated and whether it would be enough to make the internal charge jump out of the internal body. This would depend on various factors such as the charge of the internal and external bodies, the distance between them, and the strength of the materials used to construct the apparatus.

Overall, it seems that this configuration would result in the external charge remaining in place, while the internal charge may eventually escape and neutralize the internal body. However, further experimentation and calculations would be needed to fully understand the behavior of this apparatus.
 

Related to What would happen with this configuration of static charge

1. What is static charge?

Static charge is a buildup of electric charge on the surface of an object. It occurs when there is an imbalance of positive and negative charges, causing the object to have an overall positive or negative charge.

2. How does static charge affect objects?

Static charge can cause objects to attract or repel one another, depending on the charges present. It can also cause objects to stick together or cling to surfaces, and can even lead to sparks or shocks.

3. Can static charge be dangerous?

In most cases, static charge is harmless. However, it can potentially be dangerous in certain situations, such as in the presence of flammable materials or in industrial settings where large amounts of static charge can build up and cause explosions.

4. How can static charge be controlled or eliminated?

Static charge can be controlled or eliminated through various methods, such as using grounding techniques, using anti-static materials, or using ionization devices to neutralize charges.

5. What factors can affect the amount of static charge in a given configuration?

The amount of static charge present in a given configuration can be influenced by factors such as the materials involved, the humidity of the environment, and the amount of friction or movement between objects.

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