What would you see if you sent a telescope

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In summary, the concept of a powerful telescope that can accelerate to near the speed of light and observe the Earth from a distance would not allow us to see into our own future. Instead, it would allow us to see into the past as time would pass at a slower rate for the telescope than on Earth. This could be a useful method for observing the past, but it would not provide a glimpse into the future.
  • #1
bOrtiz
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like the hubble, but much more powerful, away from Earth and was able to accelerate it to near the speed of light by either gravity or some future ion accelerator. Would everything on Earth speed up for the observing telescope and hence allow us to see into our own future?
 
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No, It wouldn't
 
  • #3
From the telescope, let's say a few years would pass but say, on Earth 2,000 years would pass. When the telescope looked at the earth, it would be a few years after you launched but things on Earth would be 2,000 years later. But its not "seeing into our future" because the Earth is 2,000 years older and the people who sent the telescope into space are now 2,000 years old (dead).
 
  • #4
Right, for the telescope everything would slow down, not speed up. This would be an excellent method for seeing into the past!
 
  • #5
Pengwuino said:
From the telescope, let's say a few years would pass but say, on Earth 2,000 years would pass. When the telescope looked at the earth, it would be a few years after you launched but things on Earth would be 2,000 years later. But its not "seeing into our future" because the Earth is 2,000 years older and the people who sent the telescope into space are now 2,000 years old (dead).

Thank you for the insight!
 

1. What would you see if you sent a telescope into space?

If you sent a telescope into space, you would see the vast expanse of the universe in a whole new way. You would be able to see objects and phenomena that are not visible from Earth, such as distant galaxies, stars, and planets.

2. How far can a telescope see?

The distance a telescope can see depends on its magnifying power and the clarity of the atmosphere. With the most advanced telescopes, we can see objects billions of light years away, giving us a glimpse into the early days of the universe.

3. Can a telescope see other galaxies?

Yes, a telescope can see other galaxies. In fact, many of the stars we see in the night sky are part of our own galaxy, the Milky Way. With a powerful telescope, we can see billions of other galaxies beyond our own.

4. What is the difference between a telescope on Earth and one in space?

A telescope on Earth is limited by the Earth's atmosphere, which can distort and block light from distant objects. Telescopes in space, however, are above the atmosphere and can provide much clearer and more detailed images.

5. Can a telescope see other planets in our solar system?

Yes, a telescope can see other planets in our solar system. In fact, Galileo used a telescope to discover Jupiter's moons and observe the phases of Venus. With modern telescopes, we can see even more detail on planets like Mars, Saturn, and even the dwarf planet Pluto.

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