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Whats the pluaral of Moose?

  1. Aug 8, 2006 #1
    I'm stumped.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 8, 2006 #2

    Math Is Hard

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    It's "moose".
     
  4. Aug 8, 2006 #3

    Evo

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    Moose.......
     
  5. Aug 8, 2006 #4
    Yup it's just plain old Moose.

    "Oh look there is a bunch of Moose/Sheep/etc."
     
  6. Aug 8, 2006 #5
    Meese. :wink: :biggrin:
     
  7. Aug 8, 2006 #6

    berkeman

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    Same as the plural of deer. Well, thematically anyway.
     
  8. Aug 8, 2006 #7
    Mice. .......
     
  9. Aug 8, 2006 #8

    berkeman

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    Strange coincidence. Tonight we had a debate about what the plural of octopus is -- it took us a while to find a dictionary. I had everybody convinced it was octopi, until my wife found her (hidden) dictionary and proved that it is octupuses. Doh!
     
  10. Aug 8, 2006 #9
    English:Mooses.
    Binary:01001101 01101111 01101111 01110011 01100101 01110011
    Leet:|\/|0053rz
     
  11. Aug 8, 2006 #10
    Silly, it's both.

    http://www.m-w.com/dictionary/octopus
     
  12. Aug 8, 2006 #11
    I imagine the different plurals are for different english (Australian/English/American) I was always taught that things like platypus and octopus etc. turned to platypi and octopi for plural.
     
  13. Aug 9, 2006 #12
    I'm rather sure it was originally octopi inheriting the Latin declension, and octopuses was a bastardization. Some people would say adding the "es" makes it a standardization, because it agrees with some other plural forms. I call it bastardization.
     
  14. Aug 9, 2006 #13
    Why do they think that standardization makes language more accessible, I wonder. American-English speakers already take the path of least resistance.
     
  15. Aug 9, 2006 #14
    Actually octopi is such a 'standardization'.
     
  16. Aug 9, 2006 #15
    http://www.bartleby.com/61/86/O0028600.html
    http://dictionary.cambridge.org/define.asp?key=54908&dict=CALD

    Also agree with Webster, and disagree with Chambers. Eh, whatever.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Octopus
    There's an order octopoda, and a genus octopus. Octopoda is already a plural form, a octopodes is a plural of a transliteration I guess. Who cares really. The question is - is the common name pluralized the same way as the genus?

    From the first link above, this should settle it:
    (some symbols are not showing up in quote)

    As for common usage:
    http://scholar.google.com/scholar?hl=en&lr=&q=octopi&btnG=Search
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2006
  17. Aug 9, 2006 #16

    berkeman

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    Oh baby. This should be good. Well, not good for the mairrage (sp?), but good overall. Wish me luck!
     
  18. Aug 9, 2006 #17

    Evo

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    Lets standardize.

    Octopus = octopuses

    Moose = mooses

    mouse = mouses

    goose = gooses
     
  19. Aug 9, 2006 #18
    Heh.

    Tooth, teeth.
    Goose, geese.
    Foot, feet.

    and so:

    Shoop, sheep.
    Moose, meese.

    also:

    Mouse, mice.
    Louse, lice.

    and so:

    House, hice.
    Spouse, spice.

    Language is so wonderfully inconsistent. :D
     
  20. Aug 9, 2006 #19

    Kurdt

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    I thought octopi was what you got as a main course in a Greek restaurant. :wink:

    On the serious note I was always taught octopi was the plural and the English language is a strange thing as it adds new words all the time including slang terms and and popular uncorrect terms. This makes the language very diverse and also full of tripe. It would never occur in most other languages. (spot the deliberate mistake) :rolleyes:
     
  21. Aug 9, 2006 #20
    From lower down on that page

    Maybe we should start using octopera on the basis of opus - opera .
     
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