Whats wrong with this picture?

  • Thread starter Cyrus
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  • #1
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Main Question or Discussion Point

An email I got:

Date: Thu, 22 May 2008 00:01:18 -0400
From: fyi-poster@umd.edu
Subject: Meditation - Balancing of Chakras

Subject : Meditation - Balancing of Chakras
When : Thursday, May 22, 2008
Where : Health Center : Rm #3120 Sahet
Event Type(s) : Health

Come and experience a relaxing period of meditation with Edie Anderson connecting in mind, body and spirit to promote your health and wellbeing.

For more information, contact:
Edie Anderson
UHC
+1 301 314 9629
eanderson@health.umd.edu
www.health.umd.edu
Notice the parts in bold. I really should send them an email saying what f' is a health center at a university doing promoting such bullshizza as 'chakras'.

Better not upset the fung-sway of my charkas or the bhraman buddist gods of tea leaves might be angry! :rolleyes:
 
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Answers and Replies

  • #2
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New Age garbage has been intruding into actual medicine for a while now. The reason? People are idiots.

 
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  • #3
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I sent them an email saying this is not respected by the medical community, and it looks very poorly for a university health center to promote such nonsense.

Its too bad the summer started, or Id write to the school paper.
 
  • #4
Evo
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Balancing of chakras, eh? I'd go and demand proof. :rofl:
 
  • #5
Is it bad that I read Chakra and the first thing that came to mind was Fight Club?
 
  • #6
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I don't remember that word being in that movie. Now, if you had said Naruto, or Final Fantasy Tactics or something, then sure.
 
  • #7
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Eh, eastern medicine works, its not all crap... Feng shui has nothing to do with it...
 
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  • #8
Defennder
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I don't see anything wrong with the email. Meditation does provide genuine medical physiological benefits, if you disregard all the new age philosphical BS surrounding it. It's just that they chose to name the session "Balancing of Chakras". Why does the name matter?
 
  • #9
Because meditation relaxes you and provides its benefits regardless of how balanced your chakra is and how tuned in you are to your inner spirit. As an educational institution, a university should emphasize the former and not the latter.

To me the worst is how all this stuff is creeping into the mainstream media. Has anyone seen The Secret? :yuck: I almost puked during that movie.
 
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  • #10
Evo
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Meditation does provide genuine medical physiological benefits, if you disregard all the new age philosphical BS surrounding it.
Post a link to scientific studies showing that this is consistantly medically proven. Maybe sometimes, depending on how suggestive the person is. But that is the key, how suggestive the person is. I had the top clinical hypnotist in the US, a well known psychologist, try to hypnotize me. Told me he had never been unable to put anyone under. I was his first failure.

Meditation wouldn't work for me. My mind is too active to artificially shut it down. You have to want and believe and be very suggestive for meditation to work, so it's not something that actually works for anyone that tries it.
 
  • #11
Defennder
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It's just a name, I really don't see anything wrong with it. On the other hand, if they start handing out or selling New Age DVDs, books during the meditation session then of course that's objectionable. For the record, I don't know what chakras are, but I do agree to a certain extent that they could have written it as "Balancing the Chakras" with quotation marks if they wanted it to be nothing more than just a meditation session.
 
  • #12
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It's just a name, I really don't see anything wrong with it. On the other hand, if they start handing out or selling New Age DVDs, books during the meditation session then of course that's objectionable. For the record, I don't know what chakras are, but I do agree to a certain extent that they could have written it as "Balancing the Chakras" with quotation marks if they wanted it to be nothing more than just a meditation session.
Yes, its just a name. Until some non-science based students take it, think they feel better and start buying into that 'sh!tcra' nonsense. Woops, did I spell it wrong. :devil:

You SHOULD see something wrong with a university promoting what amounts to a pile of crap. Its a slap in the face to the biology deparment.
 
  • #13
russ_watters
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Meditation does provide genuine medical physiological benefits, if you disregard all the new age philosphical BS surrounding it. It's just that they chose to name the session "Balancing of Chakras". Why does the name matter?
So it is ok because it is only half crap? Why not actually just have a class on meditation?

Teacher: What you are going to learn today is half crap.
Student: [raises hand] Could you cover all the crap in the morning session so I can skip it and come back for the afternoon session?
Teacher: Sorry, no - you won't have any way of knowing which part is the crap, and I'm not going to tell you.
 
  • #14
Defennder
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Post a link to scientific studies showing that this is consistantly medically proven.
This isn't my area of expertise, so I am not directly acquainted with such studies. But on the other hand a quick search in ScienceDirect using my college's login shows the following:

Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology Volume 74 said:
Passage Meditation Reduces Perceived Stress in Health Professionals: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

Abstract:
The authors evaluated an 8-week, 2-hr per week training for physicians, nurses, chaplains, and other health professionals using nonsectarian, spiritually based self-management tools based on passage meditation (E. Easwaran, 1978/1991). Participants were randomized to intervention (n = 27) or waiting list (n = 31). Pretest, posttest, and 8- and 19-week follow-up data were gathered on 8 measures, including perceived stress, burnout, mental health, and psychological well-being. Aggregated across examinations, beneficial treatment effects were observed on stress (p = .0013) and mental health (p = .03). Treatment effects on stress were mediated by adherence to practices (p < .05). Stress reductions remained large at 19 weeks (84% of the pretest standard deviation, p = .006). Evidence suggests this program reduces stress and may enhance mental health.
The New Scientist Volume 196 said:
Meditation really does reduce stress

Available online 12 October 2007.

Volunteers trained in a Chinese meditation technique for just five days produced lower levels of the stress hormone cortisol when asked to perform difficult mental arithmetic

NEED to chill out and pay attention too? Just five days of training in a Chinese meditation technique can help.

Previous studies have suggested that various forms of meditation can improve attention and reduce stress, but there have been few randomised controlled trials – the best way of testing a treatment's effectiveness.

So a team led by Yi-Yuan Tang of the Dalian University of Technology in north-east China teamed up with psychologist Michael Posner of the University of Oregon, Eugene, to put a meditative technique called integrated body-mind training (IBMT) to a controlled test. The team randomly assigned 80 students to 20 minutes per day of tuition, either in how to relax the body's muscle groups or in IBMT.

After five days, those trained in IBMT scored better on tests of attention and mood. They also produced lower levels of the stress hormone cortisol when asked to perform some difficult mental arithmetic (Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, DOI: 10.1073/pnas.0707678104).

Other researchers are intrigued, but say it is unclear whether these positive effects are transient. Another question is whether longer periods of training would produce bigger or more profound cognitive changes. “The real goodies come with long-term practice,” suggests Roger Walsh, a psychiatrist who studies meditation at the University of California, Irvine.
Behaviour Research and Therapy Volume 45 said:
Randomized trial of a meditation-based stress reduction program and cognitive behavior therapy in generalized social anxiety disorder

Abstract:
Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) has been reported to reduce anxiety in a broad range of clinical populations. However, its efficacy in alleviating core symptoms of specific anxiety disorders is not well established. We conducted a randomized trial to evaluate how well MBSR compared to a first-line psychological intervention for social anxiety disorder (SAD). Fifty-three patients with DSM-IV generalized SAD were randomized to an 8-week course of MBSR or 12 weekly sessions of cognitive–behavioral group therapy (CBGT). Although patients in both treatment groups improved, patients receiving CBGT had significantly lower scores on clinician- and patient-rated measures of social anxiety. Response and remission rates were also significantly greater with CBGT. Both interventions were comparable in improving mood, functionality and quality of life. The results confirm that CBGT is the treatment of choice of generalized SAD and suggest that MBSR may have some benefit in the treatment of generalized SAD.
http://www.news.harvard.edu/gazette/daily/2006/01/23-meditation.html" [Broken]
Harvard University Gazette, January 23, 2006

http://biology.plosjournals.org/perlserv/?request=get-document&doi=10.1371/journal.pbio.0050138&ct=1 said:
Mental Training Affects Distribution of Limited Brain Resources

Author Summary: Meditation includes the mental training of attention, which involves the selection of goal-relevant information from the array of inputs that bombard our sensory systems. One of the major limitations of the attentional system concerns the ability to process two temporally close, task-relevant stimuli. When the second of two target stimuli is presented within a half second of the first one in a rapid sequence of events, it is often not detected. This so-called “attentional-blink” deficit is thought to result from competition between stimuli for limited attentional resources. We measured the effects of intense meditation on performance and scalp-recorded brain potentials in an attentional-blink task. We found that three months of intensive meditation reduced brain-resource allocation to the first target, enabling practitioners to more often detect the second target with no compromise in their ability to detect the first target. These findings demonstrate that meditative training can improve performance on a novel task that requires the trained attentional abilities.
There isn't an abstract for this article, probably because it's rather short, and I can't post it here for fear of copyright violation. If you have access you might want to check this out.
Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice Volume 78 said:
Effects of yoga and meditation on clinical and biochemical parameters of metabolic syndrome
Journal of Psychosomatic Research Volume 62 said:
A pilot randomized control trial investigating the effect of mindfulness practice on pain tolerance, psychological well-being, and physiological activity

Abstract
Objective
To investigate the effect of mindfulness training on pain tolerance, psychological well-being, physiological activity, and the acquisition of mindfulness skills.

Methods
Forty-two asymptomatic University students participated in a randomized, single-blind, active control pilot study. Participants in the experimental condition were offered six (1-h) mindfulness sessions; control participants were offered two (1-h) Guided Visual Imagery sessions. Both groups were provided with practice CDs and encouraged to practice daily. Pre–post pain tolerance (cold pressor test), mood, blood pressure, pulse, and mindfulness skills were obtained.

Results
Pain tolerance significantly increased in the mindfulness condition only. There was a strong trend indicating that mindfulness skills increased in the mindfulness condition, but this was not related to improved pain tolerance. Diastolic blood pressure significantly decreased in both conditions.

Conclusion
Mindfulness training did increase pain tolerance, but this was not related to the acquisition of mindfulness skills.
Yes, its just a name. Until some non-science based students take it, think they feel better and start buying into that 'sh!tcra' nonsense. Woops, did I spell it wrong. :devil:

You SHOULD see something wrong with a university promoting what amounts to a pile of crap. Its a slap in the face to the biology deparment.
I don't have any idea how the session would be conducted and whether it's largely going to be meditation alone or with plenty of New Age philosophical garbage thrown in. I doubt you know this either, unless you've actually been to or have heard from those who have been to similar meditation sessions organised by health centre.

I myself have been to a couple of Buddhist meditation sessions, and while I don't believe in their philosophy and religion, I find meditation itself to be rather calming. Maybe it's psychological, but it does work for me.

So it is ok because it is only half crap? Why not actually just have a class on meditation?
I would agree that it'll be better if they left out the New Age stuff. But then again anyone who finds it nonsensical can simply ignore the New Age crap and focus on the meditative practice. I did this when I attended a couple of Buddhist meditative sessions.
 
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  • #15
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This isn't my area of expertise, so I am not directly acquainted with such studies. But on the other hand a quick search in ScienceDirect using my college's login shows the following:







http://www.news.harvard.edu/gazette/daily/2006/01/23-meditation.html" [Broken]
Harvard University Gazette, January 23, 2006



There isn't an abstract for this article, probably because it's rather short, and I can't post it here for fear of copyright violation. If you have access you might want to check this out.




I don't have any idea how the session would be conducted and whether it's largely going to be meditation alone or with plenty of New Age philosophical garbage thrown in. I doubt you know this either, unless you've actually been to or have heard from those who have been to similar meditation sessions organised by health centre.

I myself have been to a couple of Buddhist meditation sessions, and while I don't believe in their philosophy and religion, I find meditation itself to be rather calming. Maybe it's psychological, but it does work for me.

I would agree that it'll be better if they left out the New Age stuff. But then again anyone who finds it nonsensical can simply ignore the New Age crap and focus on the meditative practice. I did this when I attended a couple of Buddhist meditative sessions.
Sadly, you missed the point of this thread entirely. Im not talking about meditation, nor am I complaining about meditation.
 
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  • #16
Evo
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I guess people wanting to try it are already half way there, they are willing to let their minds go. Hey, if they can and want to do that , more power to them. They are a drop in barrel though.
 
  • #17
Defennder
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Sadly, you missed the point of this thread entirely. Im not talking about meditation, nor am I complaining about meditation.
Cyrus, that part of my reply was not addressed to you. It was in response to Evo, which I quoted in my post. Anyway, I can't vouch for the veracity of these studies, since this isn't my field. It's just something I could dig up with ScienceDirect.
 
  • #18
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Cyrus, that part of my reply was not addressed to you. It was in response to Evo, which I quoted in my post. Anyway, I can't vouch for the veracity of these studies, since this isn't my field. It's just something I could dig up with ScienceDirect.
I dont doubt that meditation can relax a person, lowering stress related problems health-wise.
 
  • #19
Gokul43201
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Post a link to scientific studies showing that this is consistantly medically proven.
I think it has been pretty well established that meditation provides stress relief that is statistically significant compared to a control group with no meditation.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11305069
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?Db=pubmed&Cmd=ShowDetailView&TermToSearch=8771884&ordinalpos=1&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVAbstractPlus
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?Db=pubmed&Cmd=ShowDetailView&TermToSearch=9097338&ordinalpos=1&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVAbstractPlus
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?Db=pubmed&Cmd=ShowDetailView&TermToSearch=15356953&ordinalpos=1&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVAbstractPlus
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?Db=pubmed&Cmd=ShowDetailView&TermToSearch=17291166&ordinalpos=1&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVAbstractPlus
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?Db=pubmed&Cmd=ShowDetailView&TermToSearch=7649463&ordinalpos=1&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVAbstractPlus

Meditation wouldn't work for me.
This alone does not invalidate it as a medical treatment. There are probably hundreds of perfectly good treatments out there that do not work on any particular individual.

It's one thing to teach medically verified meditation techniques and another thing altogether to put your chakras on a tight-rope.
 
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  • #20
Evo
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I don't doubt that it can relax people that buy into it. But what about the majority of the public it doesnt work for?
 
  • #21
Ivan Seeking
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I think you all need your chakras balanced... and a dose of Almighty Cleanse.
 
  • #22
Evo
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I think you all need your chakras balanced... and a dose of Almighty Cleanse.
:rofl:
 
  • #23
Ivan Seeking
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I'd been hypnotizing myself for years before I tried regular hypnosis. In the end I really couldn't tell the difference.
 
  • #24
Gokul43201
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I don't doubt that it can relax people that buy into it. But what about the majority of the public it doesnt work for?
The medical studies show precisely that it works for a majority of people, not a minority. That is almost the point of such a statistical study!
 
  • #25
JasonRox
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http://thetrainingdoctor.com/pages/TTD_I_can't_Be_Hypnotized [Broken]

If you can't be hypnotized whatsoever, that's not a bad thing. It's actually a sad thing.
 
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