What's your favo(u)rite fish?

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In summary, the conversation discusses the 50th anniversary of "Monty Python's Flying Circus" and various fish-related elements that were featured in their shows and films. The participants express their love for the Pythons and share their favorite sketches and songs.
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jtbell

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I'm surprised that nobody has mentioned the 50th anniversary of "Monty Python's Flying Circus". It once figured prominently in an initiation ritual here, which started with the question in the thread title. :oldsmile:

 
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I think those fellows had a bit of a thing about fish.

There's the talking fish in a tank that open The Meaning of Life.
The avant-garde poem recitation about 'where is the fish', that 'went wherever I did go', in the same movie.
The skit about buying a license for Erik the pet fish
A Fish Called Wanda - at least partially Python.
 
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  • #3
There were many hilarious bits in the Monty Python shows; that wasn’t one of them...
 
  • #4
There are so many. I liked this one off the contractual obligation Album
Another fish theme
 
  • #5
jtbell said:
I'm surprised that nobody has mentioned the 50th anniversary of "Monty Python's Flying Circus". It once figured prominently in an initiation ritual here, which started with the question in the thread title. :oldsmile:


I loved the pythons. The animation, songs sketches and films all brilliant.
This is one of my favourite sketches.
 

1. What is your favorite fish?

As a scientist, it is difficult for me to choose just one favorite fish. There are over 30,000 known species of fish, each with unique characteristics and adaptations. However, if I had to choose, I would say that my favorite fish is the coelacanth. This ancient fish has remained virtually unchanged for millions of years and provides valuable insights into the evolution of vertebrates.

2. Why is the coelacanth your favorite fish?

Aside from its evolutionary significance, the coelacanth is also an interesting and mysterious creature. It was thought to be extinct until a living specimen was discovered in 1938, and it continues to fascinate scientists with its unique anatomy and behavior.

3. What other fish species do you find interesting?

There are many fish species that I find interesting, but some that stand out to me are the anglerfish, which uses a bioluminescent lure to attract prey, the mola mola or ocean sunfish, which is the heaviest bony fish in the world, and the deep-sea viperfish, with its long, needle-like teeth and large hinged jaws.

4. How do you determine which fish species are the most important?

As a scientist, I do not rank fish species based on importance. Each species plays a unique role in its ecosystem and contributes to the overall health and balance of the aquatic environment. However, some species may be considered more important for human consumption or have cultural or economic significance.

5. Can you recommend any books or resources for learning more about fish?

There are many great books and resources available for learning more about fish. Some of my personal favorites include "The Diversity of Fishes: Biology, Evolution, and Ecology" by Gene S. Helfman, "The Secret Life of Fishes" by Helen Scales, and "Fishes: A Guide to Their Diversity" by Philip A. Hastings. Additionally, there are many online databases and scientific journals that provide information on different fish species and their research.

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