When does backgroud radiation more signifigant?

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In summary, the conversation revolved around an experiment where a geiger counter was used to measure different types of radiation (alpha, beta, and gamma) at various distances (1cm, 10cm, 20cm, and 40cm) and with different materials (aluminum, paper, and lead) blocking the radiation. The question was raised if distance would affect the readings, but it was concluded that background radiation is generally constant and only becomes significant when measuring the counts over a longer period of time.
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rlrennin
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We did an experiment. We used a geiger counter to measure wafers of alpha, beta, and gamma radiation. We measured by distance away and by using thinks to block the radiation like aluminum, paper, lead. Distances were 1cm, 10 cm, 20cm, 40cm. Would the distance be the answer because there would be more background radiation the further away you get? please help me
 
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There is no more background radiation the further you move the counter from the source. It is generally constant. However to get good readings from your source at a greater distance, you were probably reading the counts over a longer time. Therefore the background radiation becomes significant as their rate become comparitable with the rate you're measuring.
 
  • #3


The amount of background radiation present varies depending on several factors such as location, altitude, and geological composition. However, generally speaking, background radiation is more significant at higher altitudes and in areas with higher levels of radioactive elements in the soil. This is because cosmic rays from outer space and naturally occurring radioactive materials such as radon gas contribute to background radiation.

In your experiment, the distance from the source of radiation does play a role in the amount of background radiation measured. As you move further away from the source, the amount of radiation decreases due to the inverse square law. This means that the intensity of radiation decreases exponentially as the distance from the source increases. Therefore, the further away you are from a source of radiation, the less significant the background radiation will be.

However, other factors such as the type of radiation and the materials used to block the radiation can also affect the results. For example, alpha particles have a short range and can be easily blocked by materials such as paper, while gamma rays have a longer range and can penetrate through thicker materials such as lead. Therefore, the type of radiation being measured and the materials used to block it can also impact the significance of background radiation.

In conclusion, while distance does play a role in the amount of background radiation measured, it is not the only factor to consider. Other factors such as altitude, location, and the type of radiation being measured also play a significant role. It is important to take all of these factors into account when conducting experiments and interpreting results related to background radiation.
 

Related to When does backgroud radiation more signifigant?

1)

What is background radiation and when does it become more significant?

Background radiation refers to the low levels of radiation that are constantly present in our environment from natural and man-made sources. It becomes more significant when it exceeds the normal background levels, which can happen due to events like nuclear accidents or increased exposure during air travel.

2)

How does background radiation affect human health?

Exposure to high levels of background radiation can increase the risk of developing certain types of cancer, such as leukemia and thyroid cancer. However, the levels of background radiation we are exposed to in our daily lives are generally not harmful to human health.

3)

What are some sources of background radiation?

Natural sources of background radiation include cosmic rays from space, radioactive elements in the Earth's crust, and radon gas. Man-made sources include nuclear power plants, medical procedures like X-rays, and consumer products such as smoke detectors.

4)

How is background radiation measured?

Background radiation is measured in units of millisieverts (mSv) or microsieverts (μSv). This unit measures the amount of radiation absorbed by the body and takes into account the type of radiation and its potential to harm human health.

5)

Are there any ways to reduce exposure to background radiation?

While it is impossible to completely avoid background radiation, there are some ways to reduce exposure. These include limiting the use of medical procedures that involve radiation, using protective measures during air travel, and avoiding exposure to radon gas by properly ventilating buildings.

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