When R tends to zero

  • Thread starter PainterGuy
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  • #1
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hello all the people,

in the formula V=IR where V is voltage, I is current and R is resistance. suppose the value of R slowly decreases to "0". in real world, i have been said, it is impossible to have some conductor with zero resistance. which means R tends toward zero without ever reaching it. now i think this is a calculus problem with which you fine people can help me.

suppose V is constant, say, 5V. how do we take limit such that when R tends to "0", "I" become infinite. please show me the light. i'm grateful.

cheers
 
Last edited:

Answers and Replies

  • #2
HallsofIvy
Science Advisor
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All you can say, or need to say, is that the limit of I as R goes to 0 does not exist.
 
  • #3
732
45
hello HallsofIvy,

could you please lead me to the step where we come to the conclusion that limit does not exist. please show me the steps. much obliged.

let V=5, let

5=IR
I=5/R
???

edit:--- what it means in this real world problem to say limit does not exist? is this not possible to say that as R goes to 0, I goes toward infinity? please show me the light.
 
Last edited:

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