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Where are we on gravitational waves/graviton?

  1. Aug 22, 2004 #1

    quasar987

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    I read about a year ago that we (humans) were building an device to detect gravitational waves (produced mainly by binary black holes and neutron star systems). Has it given any result yet?

    And what about the graviton.. is there any way we can detect it?


    And a last question: does the Zero-point theory state that there exist no gravitational waves and gravitons?
     
    Last edited: Aug 22, 2004
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 22, 2004 #2
    I cant give you a good explanation for any of your questions, but I can tell you that IIRC, there was a satellite built called LISA that was supposed to detect gravity waves, I have no idea about the results. As for the graviton...scientists are trying to detect it, they have been for some time I believe, but they have had no luck in trying to find it so far. Its a good thing because I dont believe in the graviton or the M-theory, i'm General Relativity ALL DA WAY WOOT WOOT!! Haha sorry, had to do that. Anyways, I dont know anything about Zero-point theory but I dont think it states that because nothing can "state" something being wrong when so little is known about them, and the fact that they are so hypothetical.
     
  4. Aug 22, 2004 #3

    quasar987

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    I didn't know the graviton was exclusive to string theories! I figured it was normally predicted by the wave-particle duality of QM. You got gravitationnal waves? Then you have a particle associated to it... the graviton.
     
  5. Aug 22, 2004 #4

    LURCH

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    I think that the device to which you refer is LIGO, and it has a while to go before any convincing results would be expected. Gravity waves are predicted to be horribly difficult to detect.
     
  6. Aug 22, 2004 #5

    pervect

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    You really need to do more than to just detect gravitational waves to say that you've "seen" a gravition. You need to show that the waves are quantized.

    LIGO is starting to come online, so far it hasn't detected any gravity waves, but it is still early.

    Detecting a quantum of gravitational radiation is a very far-out prospect.

    It's really best at this point to study gravity in terms of it's classical theory, general relativity, rather than attempt to quantize it.

    This is especially true since we don't have a theory of quantum gravity.
     
  7. Aug 23, 2004 #6
    The one i recall was on a poster in my physics class last year. It was an artist's view of what it would look like in space (i guess once sent there), which was an array of 3 satellites "connected" by 3 lasers like a triangle. Anyways, you are right about detecting the waves, it will be extreamly hard since the amlpitude of those waves are expected to be like the length of a nucleus, just incredibly small.
     
  8. Aug 23, 2004 #7

    LURCH

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    Ah, well then that would indeed be LISA, but she hasn't launched yet.
     
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