Where do we publish our paper if at all we have an idea and come up with a paper.

  • #26
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No, it just means that to come up with a new theory you would have had to learn all the old ones and understand them which means you would be well versed in looking for and reading scientific papers.

Yes,but we need have references right..?what if anyone solves mystery of time ,though he speculates about it and it can't be experimentally verified.will it get recognisation?...If he can't have any kind of references for this,what shall he do.?
 
  • #28
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In other words, what these people are very politely trying to tell you is that you're going to have to know where the edges of the box lie in order to know whether or not you're thinking outside the box. This takes a years of dedicated studying. Part of discovering those edges involves knowing what people who are pushing at the boundaries are working on. These developments are recorded in journals and take time to reach text-books, the form that you're probably most used to finding your information. By learning about a field, you will learn, in due time, how everything works.

Even after knowing where these edges lie, people have their papers rejected by journals because their paper does not pass the scrutiny of peer-review.

Why not go over to the appropriate sub-forum on PF and have them answer your question. You will find that there are several highly qualified people who will be able to answer your questions. That will be your first taste of having other people comment on your work. Along the way, you will also learn other things, such as being able to present yourself clearly. If you still think your stuff is original, then you may think about publishing.
 
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  • #29
Ryan_m_b
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Science undergrads learn how to read scientific papers in the first term of college? That's new to me.
Well they should know what they are, where to find them, why they need them and have an idea of how to read them. Obviously the skills ones develop in critically reading progress across years.
Yes,but we need have references right..?what if anyone solves mystery of time ,though he speculates about it and it can't be experimentally verified.will it get recognisation?...If he can't have any kind of references for this,what shall he do.?
You should read WiFO215's comment above carefully. Without knowing anything about the subject your speculation is bound to have no grounding in reality. In my experience when laymen strive to create grand theories of the universe they tend to just create complicated analogies based on their own misconceptions that have no practical use.
 
  • #30
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But for case of acquiring scholarship in most of M.sc programs requires a paper atleast in undergraduate level,then how are they expecting a paper from undergraduate level who can't spend years of time on research.
 
  • #31
Ryan_m_b
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But for case of acquiring scholarship in most of M.sc programs requires a paper atleast in undergraduate level,then how are they expecting a paper from undergraduate level who can't spend years of time on research.
I don't understand what you mean, I don't know of any examples where MSc programs require a paper to be published. It's not impossible that an applicant would have a paper (a friend of mine spent a year interning in a lab after his undergrad and managed to get his name on a paper) and that would help but it's not a requirement.
 
  • #32
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But for case of acquiring scholarship in most of M.sc programs requires a paper atleast in undergraduate level,then how are they expecting a paper from undergraduate level who can't spend years of time on research.

Aditya, I do not know of any MSc. programs that demand a paper for awarding scholarships. I understand what it is like for you, but at this stage, I don't think you need worry about such things; stop worrying about how to be 'great'.

At this point in time, do your best to learn the basics of physics well. I recommend reading 'So you want to be a physicist?' by one of our members ZapperZ.

Besides doing your best to learn the fundamentals properly, try to learn about other subjects as well. Diversify your interests at this point and try to dip your feet in everything, not just physics, not just academia. I suspect you are from India and know that exposure to such things is limited. However, given your access to the internet, you should be able to find material on absolutely anything. Simply do your best, and the rest will follow.

If the above advice is too simple for you and you still think you have to publish papers, show your friends who's boss, prove that you're the next Einstein, you could look into the Physical Review. Section D focuses on gravitation and cosmology.

Good luck.
 
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  • #33
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Note to mods: Shouldn't this thread be moved to Academic Guidance?
 

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