Where is the Hubble Telescope?

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  • Thread starter lifeonmercury
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  • #1
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I've read that Hubble is in geosynchronous orbit, but precisely what point on Earth does it remain in orbit over?
 

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  • #3
Bandersnatch
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I've read that Hubble is in geosynchronous orbit
It isn't. It's in a Low Earth Orbit.
 
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  • #4
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I see. So it does not remain over the same point on Earth. Thanks.
 
  • #5
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No it doesn't, in fact it moves quite fast relative to the surface of the Earth.
From most parts of Earth it is easy to see passing overhead a few times a year at night.
Takes maybe 15 minutes to cross the sky at most.
NASA have a timetable which people can look at to find out what times are the best for sighting at your location..
https://spotthestation.nasa.gov/sightings/
 
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  • #6
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If you put the NASA app on your phone you can set it up to alert you when certain things are passing over your location. I have used it to spot the ISS once or twice. The windows of time are just a few minutes, and it goes by fairly quickly. I'm not sure how view able hubble is.
 
  • #7
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Oooops! = major inattention on my part, I thought this was about ISS :H,
I'll put that down to overdoing it with multitasking, to many tabs open at once.
Anyway as said above, NASA do have a number of apps and websites where all the info of missions is available for the public.
(I think the Curiosity rover on Mars even has a presence on twitter!),
 
  • #8
1,047
778
Oooops! = major inattention on my part, I thought this was about ISS :H,
I'll put that down to overdoing it with multitasking, to many tabs open at once.
Anyway as said above, NASA do have a number of apps and websites where all the info of missions is available for the public.
(I think the Curiosity rover on Mars even has a presence on twitter!),
If the NASA app was working on my phone, I'd be able to check, but it seems it stopped working after that last android update.
 
  • #9
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The Hubble telescope has a lower inclination than the ISS, you need to be south of ~45°N and north of ~45°S to see it. It is one of the brightest objects in the sky for a few minutes if it flies overhead shortly before sunrise / after sunset (it has to be in the sun while the ground has to be in the darkness).

45°N is a line going through northern Italy (Milano), Crimea, central Maine, Ottawa, North/South Dakota border, Washington/Oregon border and so on.
 

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