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Where is the Sun's mother?

  1. May 12, 2010 #1
    We know our solar system had to have been formed at least partially from the remnants of a supernova, due to the abundance of heavy elements on earth and elsewhere. My question is, where is corpse of the star which gave birth to us?

    There should be a neutron star, or even a black hole, that is left behind from whatever star blew up over 6 billion years ago that we formed from, but the question is where? How far could such a star have migrated since that time from the current position of the sun, or is it likely that the sun is no where near the location of the actual star which blew up?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 12, 2010 #2

    mgb_phys

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    Elements heavier than iron were created in a supernova but that would have been very early in the formation of the galaxy - the material would have been reused through an earlier generation of stars before our sun formed.

    There isn't a specific progenitor supernova
     
  4. May 13, 2010 #3
    The Sun was probably born in a cloud of gas along with dozens to hundreds of other stars.

    Due to gravitational interaction it is thought that the stars would have been scattered into different orbits around galactic center. That was 5 billion years ago more or less. The sun orbits galactic center every 200-250 million years. So Sol has completed some 20 to 25 orbits since its birth. We are probably far from where first ignition occurred.
     
  5. May 13, 2010 #4
    200-250 millions years. How fast are we travelling, or do we not have a reference point to give it a speed?
     
  6. May 13, 2010 #5

    mgb_phys

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    About 25,000 lyr from the centre and 225M yr to go around.


     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 25, 2014
  7. May 13, 2010 #6
    The title of this topic is "Where is the Sun's mother?" Scientifically speaking, the Sun has no mother and there is no 'corpse of the star which gave birth to us'.:smile: Thank you.
     
  8. May 13, 2010 #7

    mgb_phys

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    There are several generations of pop-III and II stars that were ancestors of the sun, most of them are either completely dispersed into current pop-I stars or absorbed into the blackhole at the center.
     
  9. May 14, 2010 #8

    Chronos

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    After over many billions of years, the suns progenitor remnants could be almost anywhere in, or outside, our galaxy. It is virtually certain no single star provided all the raw materials from which our solar system formed. In other words, what mgb said.
     
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