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Where to find?

  1. Jul 13, 2007 #1
    where to find??

    well, some people told me that "Sets with Mass Zero" are quite interesting, btw i have no idea what they are, but i could not find anything related to them. So could anyone recomend anything online about these??
     
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  3. Jul 13, 2007 #2

    CompuChip

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    Are you sure it isn't supposed to read "Sets with measure zero" ?
     
  4. Jul 16, 2007 #3
    Maybe, i dont know, but i think it might be what i am looking for. Btw i just translated the "title" from my language to English.
     
  5. Jul 16, 2007 #4
    btw. i found wat i was looking for. Like you said CompuChip, it is Sets with measure zero. thnx
     
  6. Jul 23, 2007 #5
    well, i would like to know what backgroud in mathematics one should have to be able to fully understand "sets with measure zero", because they just seem to be out of my league for the moment. Btw Calculus I is all i got at the moment.
     
  7. Jul 23, 2007 #6

    CompuChip

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    If you really want to understand them you should take measure theory. In my curriculum, it was a third year course, though I actually think you don't need much more than some analysis (mainly: convergence and Riemann integration). A good introduction which doesn't require much knowledge is Measures, Integrals and Martingales by R. Schilling
     
  8. Jul 23, 2007 #7
  9. Jul 23, 2007 #8

    CompuChip

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    That's the book I meant. In my opinion, it's very accessible and doesn't require much knowledge (at least, for the first 10 chapters or so). If you want to go through all the proofs step by step, you might need a little more than Calc I, but in general I think you should be able to get the point.
    Although, after three years of university level courses, I may underestimate the level. You can buy the book anyway, skim through it; in two or three years, you can always read it again and go through the details.
     
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