Which book would you recommend to me....? (Physics and Math preparation for Aerospace Engineering)

  • Thread starter greg_rack
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  • #1
greg_rack
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Hi guys,
I'm 18 and about to start an aerospace engineering course.
I'd like to have a few cool physics and mathematics-oriented readings before starting the course... both as preparation and as an encouragement.

One thing I must tell you is that I totally prefer studying physics over pure mathematics, and that would be amazing to read a book that approaches me to the beauty of maths without delving too deep into addressed topics.

Generally, I'm not looking for a textbook with theorems and formulas, but rather more a pleasant broad-but-shallow scientific reading.
Hope I'm not asking too much, thanks in advance for any advice :)
 
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  • #2
Frabjous
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I am not sure if they are too advanced for you, but you might try looking at
Longair Theoretical Concepts in Physics
Susskind Theoretical Minimum books
You should look to see if you can follow what they are saying, not if you understand everything.

Mermin It’s About Time

They are more engineering books, but I enjoyed these popularizations
Gordon New Science of Strong Materials
Finkel Portrait of a Crack
Glass Shock Waves and Man

Thre are also the out of print Van Nostrand Momentum Books if you are lucky enough that they picked a topic of interest to you

Oxford also has a series on Very Short Introductions -some of them are on technical topics written by scientists. I have several.

On a nonstandard topic, you might try Dimensional Analysis by Bridgman.

BTW, for collecting textbooks abebooks is your friend.
 
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  • #3
mpresic3
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Paul Nahin (a retired electrical engineer, I think in New Hampshire) has written a series of excellent books, for students who have the basics in math and calculus and maybe a little differential equations or probability, but no higher math. Most are available at your local Barnes and Noble, but some may need to be ordered.

The exercises (many using the computer) have solutions right in the book, including MATLAB code. I cannot say it is a easy read, but I enjoy the texts greatly. He has a good engineer point of view as well as the physics and math.
 
  • #4
Frabjous
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Paul Nahin (a retired electrical engineer, I think in New Hampshire) has written a series of excellent books, for students who have the basics in math and calculus and maybe a little differential equations or probability, but no higher math. Most are available at your local Barnes and Noble, but some may need to be ordered.

The exercises (many using the computer) have solutions right in the book, including MATLAB code. I cannot say it is a easy read, but I enjoy the texts greatly. He has a good engineer point of view as well as the physics and math.

Have you read his book about chases? If so, any thoughts on it?
 
  • #5
mpresic3
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I own the book and I have thumbed through it and skimmed it. I think it is really good. I cannot say I read it. The math looks more difficult than some of his other books. I have taken courses in missile guidance before and this looks true to life.
 
  • #6
Frabjous
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I’ll give it a try. Thanks.
 
  • #7
greg_rack
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Thanks a lot guys for the suggestions @caz @mpresic3!
I'll definitely give a few a try
 
  • #8
mpresic3
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Correction to Nahin's books. I think the latest book Cold Electrons, Hot Molecules might be at a more advanced mathematical level than some of his earlier work. None of these books are easy. I hear Ian Stewart has a few good books. I do not own any and haven't read any yet.
 

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