Which engineering degree?

In summary, the young lady is undecided on which field of engineering to pursue and is considering computer, electrical, and mechanical engineering. She has three main questions that she wants answered: which is the easiest to find a job in, what are the average salaries for each field, and is the career path for an engineer reliable?
  • #1
559
8
Well, I have made my choice in deciding to go into engineering. I have 1 problem though, I'm not sure which type to major in. I really like computers, know how to program sufficiently, am good with electronics, and I like mechanical type things. This leads me in three different directions: computer, electrical, and mechanical.

I have 3 main questions.. (please answer from best to least)
1) Which is the easiest to find a job in.
2) Pay
3) Reliability (will be long term, or will still be viable when I graduate)I can pretty much rule out electrical, but I'm not positive yet.

Thanks for any answers.

EDIT: 1 last question, can anyone explain exactly what computer engineers will be doing? Is it programming, hardware design/testing, or both?
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
1) Meaningless. It is not "easy" to find a job.
2) Google "average engineering salary" if you want an average.
3) All engineering fields are going to be around for a long, long time.
 
  • #3
I'm in the telecommunications field ... I wish I could do pure science =)
Enginneerring is hard ... needs a lot of mental rigour, however because of my scholarship i am job secured ...

http://www.youtube.com/user/SonOfTerra92
 
  • #4
fss speaks the truth. I could tell you what is today, but things change.

Some fields are known for being unstable, but that doesn't mean you couldn't build a career with it.

Some fields are known for being tough to get in to. But diligence can overcome that.

As for salary, while you won't starve in this business, you won't make piles of money either. The track from engineer to executive is not easy. Frankly, executives look down upon engineers as the necessary nerds. There is a saying: "To get a product out the door you must first shoot the engineers." Not many firms have built engineering into the culture, regardless of what the marketeers say.

Engineering doesn't sell. The money is in marketing, sales, finance, --the stuff you learn in business school.

That's where the real money is.
 
  • #5
If you want money just be a lobbyist in DC. If you have no morals then it should be no problem
 
  • #6
Sounds like you would enjoy Computer Engineering since it does have plenty of Electrical Engineering as well. Mechanical is very different from CompE and EE. Here in the U.S there will be a growth for demand for Engineers, so I wouldn't worry too much about job prospects. As for your 2nd question, follow what fss said. I don't understand your third question. As for your edit1 question, my computer engineering prof told me for the first few years, you will be a systems checker. You will be given a code/design and it will be your job to break it to where it won't work (keep in mind that the code will be very difficult to break since this code is coming from engineers with year's of experience in design). With a few years of that, you would then be able to design your own code/designs. You will program of course and that is how you will design stuff.

If you want to find out more about what CompE's, EE's or what ME's do as well as other information regarding Engineering here in the U.S, I would go to this site:

http://www.bls.gov/oco/ocos027.htm
 

1. Which engineering degree has the best job prospects?

The engineering degree with the best job prospects varies depending on the current job market and industry demands. However, some fields that consistently have high demand for engineers include software engineering, mechanical engineering, and electrical engineering.

2. Is it better to get a general engineering degree or specialize in a specific field?

This ultimately depends on your career goals and personal interests. A general engineering degree provides a broad foundation of knowledge and skills, while a specialized degree allows you to focus on a specific area of engineering. Consider researching the job market and talking to professionals in your desired field to make an informed decision.

3. Can I switch engineering majors after starting my degree?

Yes, it is possible to switch engineering majors, but it may require additional time and coursework. It is important to speak with an advisor or counselor to understand the requirements and potential impact on your graduation timeline.

4. What are the differences between a Bachelor's and Master's degree in engineering?

A Bachelor's degree in engineering typically covers the fundamental principles and theories of engineering, while a Master's degree delves deeper into a specific area of engineering and may involve research and a thesis. A Master's degree can also lead to higher-level job opportunities and a higher salary.

5. Are there any online engineering degrees?

Yes, there are many accredited universities that offer online engineering degrees. However, it is important to research the program and make sure it is accredited by a reputable organization. Also, keep in mind that online degrees may not have the same hands-on experience and networking opportunities as traditional on-campus programs.

Suggested for: Which engineering degree?

Replies
1
Views
1K
Replies
5
Views
1K
Replies
3
Views
1K
Replies
3
Views
2K
Replies
7
Views
301
Replies
7
Views
737
Replies
15
Views
3K
Replies
6
Views
858
Replies
1
Views
987
Back
Top