Which is more respectable?

  • #26
leon1127 said:
Perhaps you should spend your time to get into a top school instead of wondering if college's maths classes are difficult or not. You might find that a differential equation class in Princeton is a little further than a DE class in community college. I hope you will like that :!!) :!!)

BTW, don't expect college too much. Just be normal and see what you really like when you get there. I thought I like EE but I have sent myself to a even more devil major-maths. I think APs were more demanding than my ODE class. APs are nowhere near HKAL pure math which is taken by HK secondary school students lol. And all we have said is that PhD is beyond just taking a class. I dont really see where we have said college maths classes (Undergrad/grad) are difficult anywehre at all. perhaps it is just my ignorance. please forgive me:frown: :frown:
well someone in this thread said college math is "extremely difficult." Anyways... What is the chance that if I do very well in for 4 years taht I could get into MIT's graduate program? I of course will like to get a taste of college before I start asking all of these questions. But, I am really interested. I have always believed in doing what you love, or your life will suck and you will suck at what you do. So I will change my major if I feel I love something else. Thanks for the information. oh and by the way, I have actually had a big tste of college with all my ap classes.
 
  • #27
J77
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physicscrap said:
Anyways... What is the chance that if I do very well in for 4 years taht I could get into MIT's graduate program?
If you're good enough, you can get in anywhere :smile:
 
  • #28
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physicscrap said:
I have actually had a big tste of college with all my ap classes.
This actually depends a lot on how these classes were taught. You are still in a relatively small classroom compared to a lecture hall with 500 students in it. Your teacher was trained to be a teacher- most professors are researchers first, teachers second (but not all of them are bad because of this). AP classes, in my experience, were still taught at a slower pace then all of the undergraduate classes I took.

What I am trying to say is do NOT base your notions of the college learning experience on high school AP classes. It is a much different world in college for many reasons.
 
  • #29
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physicscrap said:
What is the chance that if I do very well in for 4 years taht I could get into MIT's graduate program? oh and by the way, I have actually had a big tste of college with all my ap classes.

I am not trying to put you down, but the chance is relatively low if you apply from a "normal" school. Unless you get your BS in UCB or etc. I am attending a well-known school (this is how the school packages itself) in my state and the possiblility to transfer to top school is low no matter what.


Just for reference, I took 7 AP tests and 3 AP classes during my senior year (BTW, I broke the record of my HS for passing the most AP test in a year- 6 out of 7. Though I didnt break the total number because some chinese dude took 13 of them in 3 years and pass them all with 5s i think.). One AP test is about the same as one-semester worth of material in college with few exceptions. When I got into college, I THINK college classes are much EASIER than APs simply because most students are less discipline in university than in AP class. Once again, student sign up AP for themselves which college classes are mostly requirement for a specific degree.

Once again, please dont expect APs are the same as college, you might be disappointed. I thought i should start it slowly at the first semester of my college life. That was the worst decision I have ever made.
Lastly, the greatest different between APs and College class is that I DON’T GET YELLED ANYMORE BECAUSE OF NOT TURNING IN ANY HOMEWORK!! lol.
 
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  • #30
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leon1127 said:
I am not trying to put you down, but the chance is relatively low if you apply from a "normal" school. Unless you get your BS in UCB or etc. I am attending a well-known school (this is how the school packages itself) in my state and the possiblility to transfer to top school is low no matter what.
I disagree with this. I know people who went to a good state school (not top of the world but in the top 35 schools nationally) and they got into the graduate program at MIT for engineering. You do need to go to a good school for your undergrad. It is important. But really, where you do your graduate degree for physics is not as important as who your advisor is and whether or not you are doing work that is going to get you employed after you graduate. Read ZapperZ's articles entitled "So You Want to be a Physicist"

Good luck.
 
  • #31
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Norman said:
I disagree with this. I know people who went to a good state school (not top of the world but in the top 35 schools nationally) and they got into the graduate program at MIT for engineering. You do need to go to a good school for your undergrad. It is important. But really, where you do your graduate degree for physics is not as important as who your advisor is and whether or not you are doing work that is going to get you employed after you graduate. Read ZapperZ's articles entitled "So You Want to be a Physicist"

Good luck.
I'm glad to hear your opinion. I am going to the university of Puerto Rico at mayaguez (has anyone heard anything good o bad about it?). I've been doing a lot of searching on the net and cant find any reviews or opinions of it, other than UPR opinion :( . What gives me hope is that they have research programs on paralel computing with IBM and HP and thats the field that appeals to me the most so far. Regretably I get the distinct feeling that UPR is just a afirmative action engineer farm (minorities and women) for US giant corporations looking to meet their quotas.
 
  • #32
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Norman said:
I disagree with this. I know people who went to a good state school (not top of the world but in the top 35 schools nationally) and they got into the graduate program at MIT for engineering. You do need to go to a good school for your undergrad. It is important. But really, where you do your graduate degree for physics is not as important as who your advisor is and whether or not you are doing work that is going to get you employed after you graduate. Read ZapperZ's articles entitled "So You Want to be a Physicist"

Good luck.
Perhaps, you have misunderstood me. When i say normal school, i mean the one that is about or lower state university. I have talked to few undergrad student who graduate this year, most of them couldnt get into top college even they have quite high GPA but few got into really good school. When i say low, there is stil possiblility.
BTW, i am math major~
 
  • #33
J77
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OP: Why not do your undergrad studies in the US and your graduate studies in another country?
 
  • #34
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Hi all!

What about mixing the two fields?

I don't know too much about how things go in the US, but where I am at, (Hungary,Europe) it is possible to mix these fields. For example I know a prof. In my country who is involved in some Quantum Cryptographyc researches.
It means that person is something like a prof. in both fields. He has lots of stuff in Quantum Mechanics and in Computational Science as well.
Here, in Hungary, to do something like this you have to be a physician at first place.

I think those guys at IBM doing some researches in quantum information are some 'masters' of both fields, either.
 
  • #35
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hmm....base on ur interest....
for me , quantum physics is the wise choice
 
  • #36
Holier than thou...

I am not too sure why this poster feels compelled to sign up for the Ph.D capmaign, so young. Not even in college yet? I'd be surprised if most seniors know whether they will be enrolling into a graduate program.

Either way, you can kiss your private sector work good-bye with either Ph.D. Or at least, don't be surprised if companies aren't looking for doctors, but instead someone who can work.
 
  • #37
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Plastic Photon said:
Either way, you can kiss your private sector work good-bye with either Ph.D. Or at least, don't be surprised if companies aren't looking for doctors, but instead someone who can work.
Yes, because companies never employ Ph.Ds. And that is why a quick search on Monster for "Physics Ph.D." only yeilds about 173 different jobs.

Why don't you take a look at the US Department of Labor's analysis done in 2004 on a being a physicist ([URL]http://www.bls.gov/oco/ocos052.htm#emply)[/URL] before you start writing a post implying a Ph.D. won't be able to find a job outside academia and government. Especially since 33% of them work in industry.

Enough said about your poorly thought out argument.
 
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  • #38
J77
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Plastic Photon said:
Either way, you can kiss your private sector work good-bye with either Ph.D. Or at least, don't be surprised if companies aren't looking for doctors, but instead someone who can work.
If you want to go work in a bank then, of course, you shouldn't do extended study. You should join a company's graduate scheme straight after leaving uni.

However, if you want to do any original scientific research, you need a PhD.
 

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