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Which mutations cause aging

  1. Sep 30, 2009 #1
    Could somebody, possibly, provide a list of the mutations that cause aging- the specific mutations- "hotspots" and/or discuss that with me (ie you could pm me) thanks
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 1, 2009 #2

    Monique

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    A problem comes with making a definition for aging. In order to find mutations you must first have a clear phenotype to look for, something that you can measure. Aging is not something you can measure, but you can look at extremes such as Progeroid syndromes, which are commonly regarded as accelerated aging. Studying such syndromes might give us insight into an aspect of aging, but you must understand that it is not representative for aging in the general population.

    Hutchinson–Gilford progeria syndrome is caused by de novo mutations in Lamin A (LMNA), a nuclear protein. Werner progeria syndrome is caused by mutations in the WRN gene. You can find more information on PubMed.
     
  4. Oct 1, 2009 #3
    just to verify:

    you would not be able to use gene therapy in one or more organs to make it so that the mutations did not contribute to aging (until of course they accumulated again) because of gene and/or genome lengthening, even if you could do that just by repairing the repair system and/or other things?

    (Obviously theres maybe other reasons than gene/genome lengthening for why you maybe couldnt do that)

    this post is only regarding normal etc aging; not things like accelerated aging/anything like that
     
    Last edited: Oct 1, 2009
  5. Oct 1, 2009 #4
    I'm still not sure what your question is. If you're looking for information on chromosome shortening, which eventually leads to its destruction, look up telomeres. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Telomere
     
  6. Oct 1, 2009 #5
    well like my friend said okay, you could repair/replace all the mutations that contribute to aging with gene therapy, but that would end up with the- he said gene or genome- being lengthened too much and so he said it wouldnt work for that reason if nothing else.is that correct? also, you cant prevent all mutations that contribute to aging with telomere maintenance and/or other things, correct? and you cant repair and/or replace etc all the mutations that contribute to aging with anything other than gene therapy right?
     
    Last edited: Oct 1, 2009
  7. Oct 2, 2009 #6

    Monique

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    A large component of aging is wear-and-tear due to environmental factors, not genetic factors.

    If you were going to repair certain adverse mutations with gene therapy, then doing it by homologous recombination would not lengthen the genome. Thinking that gene therapy will cure aging is too speculative.
     
  8. Oct 2, 2009 #7
    Here's an article from Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, New York City that I think relates to this discussion. :smile: It's important to me to know where the money is going for research.
     
  9. Oct 2, 2009 #8
  10. Oct 2, 2009 #9
    I'm on a roll so to speak. Here's another article from Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, New York City

    I like what Dr. John M. Greally and Dr. Francis Collins said. :smile:
     
  11. Oct 2, 2009 #10
    These are relevant.

    Scaffidi P, Misteli T. Lamin A-dependent nuclear defects in human aging. Science. 2006 May 19;312(5776):1059-63. Epub 2006 Apr 27.

    Scaffidi P, Misteli T. Reversal of the cellular phenotype in the premature aging disease Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome. Nat Med. 2005 Apr;11(4):440-5. Epub 2005 Mar 6.
     
  12. Oct 6, 2009 #11
    okay well if in theory you could replace mutations using homologous recombination gene therapy...would it be possible for someone to pm me or post a list of all known mutations that definitely contribute to aging?
     
  13. Oct 6, 2009 #12

    Monique

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    You have not defined aging, so no: nobody can give you the mutations. And again, a large part of aging is environmental factors.

    For instance: what mutations causes an empty can of soda to age? Clearly it has no mutations, it is corroding by chemical actions.
     
  14. Oct 6, 2009 #13
    well I understand that theres other potential causes of aging than mutations
    I guess by aging I mean= what leads to death..organ failure..etc..I suppose I need to be more specific...so I wanted a list of all the mutations that contribute to this so I can see what mutated genes would need to be replaced via homologous recombination recombination to make it so that, those genes were not mutated (under they became mutated again of course). if some mutations cant be put on a list because theyd be specific to an individual I understand. But Id really like a list or talk to someone about getting a list maybe someone could pm or something, Id be willing to pay for a list
    I realize defining aging and not being able to measure it etc make it more complex. I guess I should come up with a better definition for aging then "the changes that come with time that kill you" for the purpose of this thread I mean give me some time and I'll try to come up with a better definition of aging for the purposes of this thread but you sort of get the jist of what I mean when I say aging right; wrinkles death etc

    but like I..would like to know about getting a list of the known mutations that contribute to aging (I know not every mutation will be included on there) I realize I need to define aging first for the purposes of this thread..but you sort of get the jist of what I mean by aging right...please, any help is appreciated; thanks


    also I understand there are causes of aging other than mutations; if so perhaps give a list? If you define aging as accumulating injuries you could maybe repair the body with stem cells etc so...Im not referring to injuries as a cause of aging (in this thread) what environmental causes of aging are you referring to. I know mutations for sure cause aging dont know the other causes also Im only referring to biological human tissue aging

    i know there may be/is other reasons for aging Im just trying to find out about mutations if anyone could help like a lot or a little or something they could also pm me their email address etc or just pm me

    thanks
     
  15. Oct 6, 2009 #14

    Monique

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    In the second post you mention you are only interested in normal aging and not accelerated aging syndromes. I guess the best general hallmark of 'healthy aging' is longevity, you may be interested in studying the journal of Biogerontology. There have been recent advances where by mutating certain genes scientists were able to increase the longevity of the nematode C. elegans, you might want to look into that as well.

    There still is the problem that there may be alleles or mutations that dispose you to age faster than someone else (as in the case of accelerated aging syndromes), but there is also the situation where the process of aging introduced mutations in the genome (this would fit the description of injuries, the process is random and different for each cell in your body). From your description it is not clear which of the two you are talking about.
     
  16. Oct 6, 2009 #15
    I realize that there may be mutations in an individual which may allow them to age faster/may be different from mutations in other individuals..I just want a list of the mutations that definitely contribute t aging in all individuals or @ least most individuals; u could always check to see if a person didnt have the mutation I guess yes I need to read the different journals etc if anyone can help me get the lists faster please let me know

    if youre aware of any other causes of aging please list them

    what I want to do is take a cell and compare it to a template/human genome to see the mutations let me know if someone cna help me with that
     
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2009
  17. Oct 6, 2009 #16

    Monique

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    Such a list does not exist, as I've been trying to tell you aging is a complex multi-factorial syndrome whose definition is not well defined. Genetic research will thus be extremely difficult, if not impossible to do in humans (unless you take extremes).
     
  18. Oct 6, 2009 #17
    okay well then...Id just like to know all the mutations inside a sample cell- unless I would not be able to tell whether or not they are mutations even using a template
     
  19. Oct 7, 2009 #18
    also having extra copies of genes= not an answer to mutations right?
     
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